Golf

Indian Golf round-up: Lahiri opens with three-under 68 in Dallas, Baisoya slips to T-23 in China

Lahiri hit five birdies against two bogeys at the end of 18 holes.

India’s Anirban Lahiri shot three-under 68 in the opening round to lie tied 44th at the AT&T Byron Nelson Championships golf tournament.

Lahiri hit five birdies against two bogeys at the end of 18 holes.

Daniel Chopra, playing only his second PGA Tour event this season, shot three-over 74 and will need a very low number to make the cut.

Meanwhile, the leader was Australian Marc Leishman, who has one of the best scoring averages in tournament history as he opened with a 10-under 61 round.

JJ Spaun and Texan Jimmy Walker were three shots back at seven-under 64.

Spaun had six birdies in a span of seven holes for a 30 on his second nine. Local star Jordan Spieth was eight shots behind the leader with a round of two-under 69.

Lahiri birdied fifth and seventh, but a dropped shot on ninth meant he turned in one-under. A second bogey on 10th brought him back to even par, but birdies on 11th, 14th and 16th meant he finished at three-under.

The 34-year-old Leishman opened with an eagle, started the back nine with three straight birdies and reached nine-under with another eagle at the 14th.

He had chances to go lower but settled for a 10-foot birdie putt at the par-3 17th for the lowest round of his PGA TOUR career. He was a stroke shy of the Nelson record.

Sam Saunders, Aaron Wise and Keith Mitchell shot matching 65s playing in the first group off the first tee. Defending champion Billy Horschel shot 68.

Baisoya slips

India’s Honey Baisoya slipped down the leaderboard to tied 23rd spot on the second day as his putter failed at the USD 300,000 Asia-Pacific Classic golf tournament on Friday.

The 27-year-old Indian, who was tied second after the first day, added a one-over 73 to his first round of five-under 67 and at four-under 140.

He was one of the two Indians who made the halfway cut, while the other two fell by the wayside.

S Chikkarangappa (72-71) was tied 47th, but Viraj Madappa (76-73) and Himmat Rai (78-75) missed the cut.

Baisoya’s record on his home tour in India is excellent with six wins in last

two-and-a-half years, including back-to-back wins last month besides a second place finish and another fourth place. He also leads his home tour, PGTI’s Order of Merit.

Chawrasia falters in Belgium

India’s SSP Chawrasia opened with a below-par five-over 77 to make a disappointing start to his campaign at the inaugural Belgian Knockout golf tournament.

Chawrasia had two birdies, four bogeys and two doubles in his opening round at Rinkven International Golf Club. He will play his second round later in the day.

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