Babri Masjid demolition

Not just 1992, Babri Masjid was focus of conspiracy in 1949 too

The mysterious appearance of an idol of Ram inside the Babri Masjid one night in 1949 was also the result of a well-planned conspiracy.

Investigative website Cobraposts latest sting operation claimed on Friday that the demolition of Babri Masjid on December 6, 1992 was not the result of a spontaneous mob frenzy, as the accused in the case have maintained, but rather the outcome of a well-orchestrated conspiracy by the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, with the knowledge of senior leaders of Bharatiya Janata Party and the Shiv Sena.

These organisations had led a long movement to build a Ram temple on the site of the Babri Masjid in Ayodhya, claiming that it was the birthplace of Lord Ram. They alleged that the Muslim shrine had come up in place of a temple that had been demolished there in 1527. The Cobrapost investigation demonstrates that the demolition was planned with great precision.

December 1992 wasn't the first time the Babri Masjid had been the subject of a conspiracy. It had been the subject of attention for Hindutva elements ever since India attained independence.

In 1947, Babri Masjid was a mosque. Two years later, on the night of December 22, 1949, an idol of Ram Lalla appeared mysteriously inside the mosque, transforming it, for all practical purposes, into a temple. The appearance of the idol was presented as a matter of divine intervention to conceal a plan executed by the Hindu Mahasabha, the BJP’s predecessor, in collaboration with a few sadhus from Ayodhya.

As a result, the Babri Masjid served as a temple from 1949 until it was demolished by a mob one afternoon in 1992. This time the conspiracy was even more obvious than the one in 1949.

The mosque was demolished in broad daylight as lakhs of karsevaks (volunteers) gathered at the site. Senior BJP leaders such as LK Advani and Uma Bharati were present at the site. Despite this, Hindutva parties have repeatedly argued that it was a spontaneous act of a frenzied mob.

The Central Bureau of Investigation, even after many years of work, has not been able to find clinching evidence against the 40 people it has named in its charge sheet.

“If we could collect so much evidence to prove that the demolition of Babri Masjid was an act of planned sabotage, imagine how much more evidence could have been gathered had a proper attempt been made in the immediate aftermath of the demolition,” said Aniruddha Bahal, editor of Cobrapost. He said the sting operation was carried out over a period of two years.

At a press conference on Friday, he screened video-taped interviews in which the leaders of the BJP, the Vishwa Hindu Parishad, the Bajrang Dal and the Shiv Sena claimed that the demolition was carried out with precision by their volunteers after going through intense training and mock drills. Among those interviewed were BJP leaders Uma Bharti, Kalyan Singh and Vinay Katiyar, who talk about the conspiracy and events that preceded the demolition. Cobrapost interviewed 23 leaders who were allegedly in the forefront of the demolition.

According to Cobrapost, the people interviewed by its journalists named BJP leaders LK Advani, Murli Manohar Joshi, Uma Bharti and others for “secretly planning” the demolition. It also claimed that Kalyan Singh, who as then chief minister of Uttar Pradesh, and PV Narsimha Rao, who was prime minister at the time, were aware of the imminent demolition.

We welcome your comments at
Sponsored Content BY 

Why should inclusion matter to companies?

It's not just about goodwill - inclusivity is a good business decision.

To reach a 50-50 workplace scenario, policies on diversity need to be paired with a culture of inclusiveness. While diversity brings equal representation in meetings, board rooms, promotions and recruitment, inclusivity helps give voice to the people who might otherwise be marginalized or excluded. Inclusion at workplace can be seen in an environment that values diverse opinions, encourages collaboration and invites people to share their ideas and perspectives. As Verna Myers, a renowned diversity advocate, puts it “Diversity is being invited to the party, inclusion is being asked to dance.”

Creating a sense of belonging for everyone is essential for a company’s success. Let’s look at some of the real benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace:

Better decision making

A whitepaper by Cloverpop, a decision making tool, established a direct link between inclusive decision making and better business performance. The research discovered that teams that followed an inclusive decision-making process made decisions 2X faster with half the meetings and delivered 60% better results. As per Harvard Business School Professor Francesca Gino, this report highlights how diversity and inclusion are practical tools to improve decision making in companies. According to her, changing the composition of decision making teams to include different perspectives can help individuals overcome biases that affect their decisions.

Higher job satisfaction

Employee satisfaction is connected to a workplace environment that values individual ideas and creates a sense of belonging for everyone. A research by Accenture identified 40 factors that influence advancement in the workplace. An empowering work environment where employees have the freedom to be creative, innovative and themselves at work, was identified as a key driver in improving employee advancement to senior levels.


A research by stated the in India, 62% of innovation is driven by employee perceptions of inclusion. The study included responses from 1,500 employees from Australia, China, Germany, India, Mexico and the United States and showed that employees who feel included are more likely to go above and beyond the call of duty, suggest new and innovative ways of getting work done.

Competitive Advantage

Shirley Engelmeier, author of ‘Inclusion: The New Competitive Business Advantage’, in her interview with Forbes, talks about the new global business normal. She points out that the rapidly changing customer base with different tastes and preferences need to feel represented by brands. An inclusive environment will future-proof the organisation to cater to the new global consumer language and give it a competitive edge.

An inclusive workplace ensures that no individual is disregarded because of their gender, race, disability, age or other social and cultural factors. Accenture has been a leading voice in advocating equal workplace. Having won several accolades including a perfect score on the Human Rights Campaign’s Corporate equality index, Accenture has demonstrated inclusive and diverse practices not only within its organisation but also in business relationships through their Supplier Inclusion and Diversity program.

In a video titled ‘She rises’, Accenture captures the importance of implementing diverse policies and creating an inclusive workplace culture.


To know more about inclusion and diversity, see here.

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of Accenture and not by the Scroll editorial team.