On the agenda

Delhi weekend cultural calendar: New Year day’s wildlife walk, a Congolese band and much more

There's a lot happening in the nation's capital over the next three days.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30
THEATRE KL Saigal at Shri Ram Centre
Directed by M. Sayeed Alam and performed by city-based theatre group Pierrot’s Troupe, KL Saigal is about the life of the famous Hindi film singer and actor. Tickets priced at Rs 100 and Rs 300 per person are being sold on Bookmyshow.com.
When: Friday, December 30 at 7 pm.

Where: Shri Ram Centre, Mandi House, 4 Safdar Hashmi Marg. Tel: 011 2373 1112.

THEATRE William & Mary at Akshara Theatre
This English and Hindi play directed by Shuddho Banerjee is based on the 1959 short story of the same name by Roald Dahl. After William dies of cancer, a doctor transplants his brain, attaching it to an artificial heart. He also hooks up one of William’s eyes to the brain. The relationship between William’s widow Mary and his new avatar reveals the sorry state of their marriage when he was alive. Tickets priced at Rs 150 per person are being sold on Bookmyshow.com.

When: Friday, December 30 at 7 pm and 8.30 pm.

Where: Akshara Theatre, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, near Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital. Tel: 011 2374 2083.

MUSIC Frisky Pints at Depot 48
Delhi-based pop-rock trio Frisky Pints, the members of which are originally from Mizoram, will play tracks from their recently-released album Feeling Frisky. The cover charge is Rs 300 per person. See the Facebook event page for more information.
When: Friday, December 30 at 8.45 pm.
Where: Depot 48, N3, Second Floor, N Block Market, Greater Kailash I. Tel: 011 4508 1948.

MUSIC 4th Element at The Piano Man Jazz Club
Shillong-based jazz-funk band 4th Element will perform. There is no entry fee. See the Facebook event page for more information.
When: Friday, December 30 at 9 pm.

Where: The Piano Man Jazz Club, Ground Floor, B6-7/22, Safdarjung Enclave Market, opposite Deer Park, Safdarjung. Tel: 011 3310 6260.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31
WALKS Tawaifs of Chawri Bazaar at Chawri Bazaar

This walk will attempt to clear misconceptions about tawaifs (courtesans) from the Mughal era and will include visits to the kothas once inhabited by them. Tickets priced at Rs 699 per person are being sold on Bookmyshow.com. Participants are required to report 15 minutes before the start time.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 9 am.

Where: The meeting point is outside Gate No. 3, Chawri Bazaar Metro Station.

THEATRE Waiting for Godot at L.T.G. Auditorium
Director Vikas Sharma will helm an English production of Samuel Beckett’s classic play Waiting For Godot. Tickets priced at Rs 200, Rs 300 and Rs 500 per person are being sold on Bookmyshow.com.
When: Saturday, December 31 at 2.30 pm.

Where: LTG Auditorium, Mandi House, 1 Copernicus Marg, opposite Doordarshan Bhavan, Connaught Place. Tel: 011 2338 9713.

THEATRE Sitara Gir Parega Sab Laal Ho Jayega 1857 at Shri Ram Centre
This Hindi play directed by MK Raina focuses on the events leading up to the revolt of 1857. Tickets priced at Rs 100, Rs 200 and Rs 300 per person are being sold on Bookmyshow.com.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 3.30 pm and 6.30 pm.

Where: Shri Ram Centre, 4 Safdar Hashmi Marg, Mandi House. Tel: 011 2373 1112.

THEATRE Refund at LTG Auditorium
Directed by Sunil Chauhan, Hindi play Refund is an adaptation of Hungarian writer Fritz Karinthy’s story of the same name about an unemployed man who returns to his school to ask his principal for a full refund of his tuition fee. Tickets priced at Rs 200, Rs 300 and Rs 500 per person are being sold on Bookmyshow.com.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 5 pm.

Where: LTG Auditorium, Mandi House, 1 Copernicus Marg, opposite Doordarshan Bhavan, Connaught Place. Tel: 011 2338 9713.

THEATRE 100 Gram Zindagi at LTG Auditorium
Hindi play 100 Gram Zindagi, written and directed by Vipin K. Sethie, is a drama about a miserly man Prakash, his dominating wife and their two sons Ankush and Ayush. Tickets priced at Rs 200, Rs 300 and Rs 500 per person are being sold on Bookmyshow.com.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 7 pm.

Where: LTG Auditorium, Mandi House, 1 Copernicus Marg, opposite Doordarshan Bhavan, Connaught Place. Tel: 011 2338 9713.

MUSIC Faridkot at Flyp@MTV
Delhi-based Hindi pop-rock group Faridkot will play the venue’s New Year’s Eve party. Tickets priced at Rs 3,500 and Rs 4,500 per person and Rs 5,000 and Rs 7,000 per couple, which entitle attendees to unlimited rounds of select alcohol and food, are being sold here. See the Facebook event page for more information.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 8 pm.

Where: Flyp@MTV, N/57 and N/60, First Floor, Outer Circle, Connaught Place. Tel: 011 3310 5181.

MUSIC Diljit Dosanjh at The Leela Ambience Gurugram Hotel & Residences
Punjabi and Hindi film actor and singer Diljit Dosanjh will perform.
Tickets priced at Rs 14,999 per couple, which entitle attendees to unlimited food and alcohol, are being sold on Insider.in.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 8.30 pm.

Where: The Leela Ambience Gurugram Hotel & Residences, National Highway 8, Ambience Island, Gurgaon. Tel: 0124 442 5444.

MUSIC The 4-AF at Depot 48

City-residing Congolese band The 4-AF, which plays a mix of R&B, salsa and tango, will provide the music for the venue’s New Year Eve celebrations. Tickets priced at Rs 3,750 per person, which entitle attendees to unlimited rounds of alcohol and a flying buffet, are being sold on Insider.in. See the Facebook event page for more information.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 8.45 pm.

Where: Depot 48, N3, Second Floor, N Block Market, Greater Kailash I. Tel: 011 4508 1948.

MUSIC Dr Joseph Howell + The New Delhi Music Scene at The Piano Man Jazz Club

American jazz clarinet player and composer Joseph David Howell and The New Delhi Music Scene, comprising guitarist Pranai Gurung, bassists Sonic Shori and Harshit Misra, drummer Aditya Dutta and pianist and The Piano Man Jazz Club proprietor Arjun Sagar Gupta, will perform. There is no entry fee. See the Facebook event page for more information.

When: Saturday, December 31 at 9 pm.
Where: The Piano Man Jazz Club, Ground Floor, B6-7/22, Safdarjung Enclave Market, opposite Deer Park, Safdarjung. Tel: 011 3310 6260.

COMEDY Jeeveshu Ahluwalia + Sumit Anand + Cueless Improv at Canvas Laugh Club
Stand-up comics Jeeveshu Ahluwalia from Delhi and Sumit Anand from Singapore and city-based comedygroup CueLess Improv will perform at this special New Year’s Eve show. Tickets priced Rs 4,500 per couple and Rs 7,500 per person for single men, which entitle attendees to unlimited rounds of select food and alcohol, are being sold here.
When: Saturday, December 31 at 9.30 pm.
Where: Canvas Laugh Club, The People & Co., Tower 8-B, Cyber Hub, DLF Cyber City, Gurgaon. Tel: 0124 414 1000.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1,
2017
PHOTOGRAPHY Nipun Nayyar at India Habitat Centre
A show of travel images titled Of Miles and Me by New York-based travel and street photographer Nipun Nayyar.
When: Until Thursday, January 5, 2017. Open daily, from 10 am to 8 pm.
Where: Convention Centre Foyer, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road. Tel: 011 2468 2002.

WALKS New Year Day’s Walk in Sanjay Van
Ornithologist Nikhil Devasar will lead a wildlife walk in the forest area of Sanjay Van near Vasant Kunj, which is famous for being a habitat for birds and butterfly species as well as nilgai and hyenas. There is no entry fee; register by calling 011 43663093 or by sending an email to habitatprogrammes@gmail.com.

When: Sunday, January 1, 2017 at 2 pm.
Where: The meeting point will be shared with those who register.

MUSIC Bazm: Shaam-E-Ghazal at Kamani Auditorium
Ghazal singers Talat Aziz, Ashok Khosla and Chandan Dass, each of whom is from Mumbai, will perform at the 2017 edition of this annual concert. There is no entry fee. See the Facebook event page for more information.

When: Sunday, January 1 at 6.15 pm.

Where: Kamani Auditorium, Copernicus Marg, Janpath. Tel: 011 4350 3352.

ONGOINGART Seher Shah at Nature Morte
Drawings, etchings, woodcuts, photographs and sculptures make up Pakistani artist Seher Shah’s solo show Of Absence and Weight. See the Facebook event page for more information.
When: Until Saturday, February 11, 2017. Open Monday to Saturday, from 10 am to 6 pm; Sunday, closed.

Where: Nature Morte, A-1, Neeti Bagh, August Kranti Marg, opposite Kamala Nehru College. Tel: 011 41740215.

ART Niyeti Chadha Kannal at Gallery Latitude 28
A show of collages titled Weaving Shards by US-based artist Niyeti Chadha Kannal. See the Facebook event page for more information.
When: Until Tuesday, January 17, 2017. Open Monday to Saturday, from 11 am to 7 pm; Sunday, closed.

Where: Gallery Latitude 28, F-208, Lado Sarai. Tel: 011 4679 1111.

ART Takayuki Yamamoto at Japan Foundation
The Japan Foundation is hosting an exhibition by Japanese artist Takayuki Yamamoto whose “projects portray the peculiarities of social systems and customs by which people are raised”. The exhibition also features pieces created by school children at workshops the artist conducted in Delhi. There is no entry fee. See here or the Facebook event page for more information.

When: Until Saturday, February 4, 2017. Open Monday to Saturday, from 11 am to 7 pm; Sunday, closed.

Where: Japan Foundation, 5A Ring Road, Lajpat Nagar IV. Tel: 011 2644 2967.

These recommendations have been compiled by The Daily Pao.

We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
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