Plagiarism charges

‘Borderlands’ versus ‘Borderlands’: A writer accuses another (and his publisher) of copying her book

Suchitra Vijayan has alleged in court that Pradeep Damodaran’s book owes much to hers in terms of concept, content and even the title.

It isn’t often that a book from a well-known publisher faces the sort of allegations that journalist Pradeep Damodaran’s Borderlands: Travels Along India’s Boundaries has. Published by Hachette India, the book ran into territorial issues just days before it was to hit the bookstores on March 15.

The Chennai-based writer, lawyer, photographer Suchitra Vijayan moved court to object to the release of Damodaran’s book, claiming its contents are nearly identical to a book she has been working on since 2012. On March 5, the Madras High Court granted an interim injunction to Vijayan for four weeks, valid till April 3, retraining the two defendants – Hachette Book Publishing India Private Limited and Pradeep Damodaran from “directly or indirectly in any manner, copying, reproducing, adapting, using the plaintiff’s content in the impugned work amounting to infringement of copyright, or in any other manner whatsoever, pending disposal of the suit.”

The court order also specifically ordered the defendants from using or passing off their book title and cover design as their own, both of which Vijayan claims have been “slavishly imitated” from her book project.

The allegation

Damodaran’s (his previous book is titled The Mullaperiyar Water War: The Dam That Divided Two States, published in 2014 by Rupa Publications) book covers his travels to the areas on the borders between India and its neighbours, such as Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Myanmar, as well as to the extreme edges of the country, such as Campbell Bay in Andaman and Nicobar. Trouble is, Vijayan claims that her book covers precisely the same areas, with the same theme. And that it predates Damodaran’s.

According to Vijayan’s complaint, filed by her lawyer Arun C Mohan, the contents of Damodaran’s book appear to be very closely on the lines of her research, which she began working on as a graduate student at Yale in 2012. “She was embedded with the ISAF forces – 172 infantry brigade, in Paktika Province, Afghanistan conducting research counterinsurgency practices in the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, which became her graduating thesis. The applicant spent two years researching and documenting stories along the contentious Durand Line, and later travelled throughout the northern frontiers of India and has documented her experiences in the book titled ‘Borderlands’ described as ‘A Journey through India’s border’,” states the complaint to the court.

Vijayan’s was to be a crowdfunded project, through a Kickstarter page that was launched in March 2013 following a piece published in The Huffington Post, titled A Journey Through India’s Borders. The piece also has a poster designed by Sruthi Vijayan which, the applicant, claims has been copied by Hachette for Damodaran’s book.

The defence

When Scroll.in contacted Hachette India for a response, the company responded with this statement: “Hachette India are shocked at Suchitra Vijayan’s allegations against our book Borderlands and our author Pradeep Damodaran. The allegations are completely false and are purely based on conjecture and misinformation. As the matter is in court we shall wait for due process to unfold. We would however like to put on record that we are appalled at this denigration of Pradeep’s hard work over many years. We condemn Ms Vijayan’s attempts to malign the book, the author and us the publisher and shall take full legal recourse as necessary.”

Excerpts from Vijayan’s book, along with the title “Borderlands” have appeared in the print and online media since. “The applicant states that she created an extensive book proposal, amounting to 50 pages, which has been circulated to multiple publishing houses,” the complaint further states. “The book proposal gives an outline of each chapter, consisting of excerpts from the book.”

Vijayan claims Prerna Vohra, editor at Hachette, approached her expressing interest in reading this book proposal on October 24, 2016. Vijayan, however, said she opted out of talks with Hachette over a phone call on December 7, 2016, as she was already in conversation with three other publishing houses at the time.

When Scroll.in contacted Hachette India for a comment on these claims, a representative said, “As the matter is sub judice we wouldn’t like to comment further on this till we’ve made our representations in court.”

The counter-claims

In February 2017, it came to Vijayan’s notice, she said, that Hachette India was publishing a book titled Borderlands: Travels along India’s Boundaries. “The applicant reasonably believes that the 1st respondent [Hachette] has commissioned the 2nd respondent [Damodaran] in the year 2015 to replicate the contents of the applicant’s book proposal, along with an almost identical title.” Vijayan contends that the book has replicated the “storyline, plot and narrative” of her book.

On her website, under the “The Borderlines Project” section, Vijayan states she is currently in the process of finishing her book. Her description of this project: “The book Borderlands is my 9,000-mile journey through India’s borders to better understand the human dimension of political borders. It is a travelogue chronicling stories along India’s border with Pakistan, China, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Burma. Part visual anthropology and partly an attempt at understanding the Indian state, and the fringes it governs.”

On Hachette India’s website, Damodaran’s book is summarised thus: “For most residents of India’s bustling metros and big towns, nationality and citizenship are privileges that are often taken for granted. The country’s periphery, however, is dotted with sleepy towns and desolate villages whose people, simply by having more in common with citizens of neighbouring nations than with their own, have to prove their Indian identity every day. It is these specks on the country’s map that Pradeep Damodaran rediscovers as he travels across India’s borders for a little more than a year, experiencing life in far-flung areas that rarely feature in mainstream conversations…From Minicoy in Lakshadweep to Taki in West Bengal, Tawang in Arunachal Pradesh to Raxaul in Bihar, Damodaran’s compelling narrative reinforces the idea that, in India, a land of contrasts and contradictions, beauty and diversity, conflict comes in many forms.”

It’s difficult to predict the outcome of this battle. While there have been charges of plagiarism in the past – most recently concerning Rajiv Malhotra’s book Indra’s Net – there haven’t been many accusations of the scope of those of Vijayan’s against Damodaran and Hachette. Nor, in the recent past, has a major publisher had to deal with a speedily obtained court injunction against publishing a book on these grounds. The final ruling will set several precedents.

Support our journalism by subscribing to Scroll+ here. We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
Sponsored Content BY 

Movies can make you leap beyond what is possible

Movies have the power to inspire us like nothing else.

Why do we love watching movies? The question might be elementary, but one that generates a range of responses. If you had to visualise the world of movies on a spectrum, it would reflect vivid shades of human emotions like inspiration, thrill, fantasy, adventure, love, motivation and empathy - generating a universal appeal bigger than of any other art form.

“I distinctly remember when I first watched Mission Impossible I. The scene where Tom Cruise suspends himself from a ventilator to steal a hard drive is probably the first time I saw special effects, stunts and suspense combined so brilliantly.”  

— Shristi, 30

Beyond the vibe of a movie theatre and the smell of fresh popcorn, there is a deeply personal relationship one creates with films. And with increased access to movies on television channels like &flix, Zee Entertainment’s brand-new English movie channel, we can experience the magic of movies easily, in the comforts of our home.

The channel’s tagline ‘Leap Forth’ is a nod to the exciting and inspiring role that English cinema plays in our lives. Comparable to the pizazz of the movie premieres, the channel launched its logo and tagline through a big reveal on a billboard with Spider-Man in Mumbai, activated by 10,000 tweets from English movies buffs. Their impressive line-up of movies was also shown as part of the launch, enticing fans with new releases such as Spider-Man: Homecoming, Baby Driver, Blade Runner 2049, The Dark Tower, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle and Life.

“Edgar Wright is my favourite writer and director. I got interested in film-making because of Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the dead. I love his unique style of storytelling, especially in his latest movie Baby Driver.”

— Siddhant, 26

Indeed, movies can inspire us to ‘leap forth’ in our lives. They give us an out-of-this-world experience by showing us fantasy worlds full of magic and wonder, while being relatable through stories of love, kindness and courage. These movies help us escape the sameness of our everyday lives; expanding our imagination and inspiring us in different ways. The movie world is a window to a universe that is full of people’s imaginations and dreams. It’s vast, vivid and populated with space creatures, superheroes, dragons, mutants and artificial intelligence – making us root for the impossible. Speaking of which, the American science fiction blockbuster, Ghost in the Shell will be premiering on the 24th of June at 1:00 P.M. and 9:00 P.M, only on &flix.

“I relate a lot to Peter Parker. I identified with his shy, dorky nature as well as his loyalty towards his friends. With great power, comes great responsibility is a killer line, one that I would remember for life. Of all the superheroes, I will always root for Spiderman”

— Apoorv, 21

There are a whole lot of movies between the ones that leave a lasting impression and ones that take us through an exhilarating two-hour-long ride. This wide range of movies is available on &flix. The channel’s extensive movie library includes over 450 great titles bringing one hit movie premiere every week. To get a taste of the exciting movies available on &flix, watch the video below:

Play

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of &flix and not by the Scroll editorial team.