India in England 2018

Eng vs Ind, 2nd Test, day 2 as it happened: India bowled out for 107 as Anderson takes 5 wickets

Live updates from the second Test between India and England at Lord’s.

Preview: Looking back at India’s most famous Tests at Lord’s. Read here.

Day one: First day washed out without a ball being bowled.

Early lunch on day two: India 11/2 in 6.3 overs

Close of play on Day 1

“Tough conditions but very poor batting... I would like to see more fight, not enough character.” - Sourav Ganguly

It was that kind of day. Difficult conditions, perfect for swing bowling and England made the most of it. Anderson, Woakes, Curran were all very good. India were just poor and they have lost their top order early in every Test so far in the series. It does not bode well for them. For now, India will hope that that conditions remain the same tomorrow as well so that their bowlers can push the England batsmen too.

India: 107 all out after 35.2 overs (Shami 10)

WICKET! And that is that. Anderson ends up with another five wicket haul at Lord’s. His sixth five-wicket at Lord’s and it takes his tally at the ground up to 99. Anderson’s final bowling figures – 13.2-5-20-5. And that is close of play too.

I Sharma lbw b Anderson 0 (3b)

India: 107/9 after 35 overs (Shami 10, Ishant 0)

Shami throwing his bat around and scoring runs too. No point just hanging around in the middle.

India: 96/9 after 34.2 overs (Shami 0)

WICKET! Now Broad traps Ashwin in front of the wicket. The decision was reviewed once again and once again, it would have hit the middle stump. A lovely innings by Ashwin comes to an end.

R Ashwin lbw b Broad 29 (38b 4x4)

India: 96/8 after 34 overs (Ashwin 29)

WICKET! Anderson strikes again to trap Kuldeep in front of the stumps. He set up with a few deliveries that were angled towards the slips and then slipped in the one that came into the left-hander. The review showed that the ball would have hit the middle of the middle stump.

Kuldeep Yadav lbw b Anderson 0 (11b)

India: 95/7 after 33 overs (Ashwin 28, Kuldeep 0)

Nine runs coming in that Broad over. Ashwin is sticking to his guns here. He is playing a lot off the back foot and goes even deeper into the crease – trying to hit the ball on the top of it’s bounce. Ashwin is now the leading scorer for India in this innings.

India: 84/7 after 29.4 overs (Ashwin 17)

WICKET! Anderson back into the attack and it takes him 4 balls to send Rahane back to the dressing room. Great line, great length, enough movement, edge and well caught by Cook at first slip.

A Rahane c Cook b Anderson 18 (44b, 2x4 )

India: 80/6 after 28 overs (Rahane 18, Ashwin 13)

Woakes (2.6 degrees) and Curran (2.5 degrees) have got more swing than Jimmy Anderson (1.7 degrees) today. Ashwin was almost dismissed in the over - a top-edge went straight up but Rashid lost it in the lights! Woakes was all smiles at the end of it but he could have easily had 5 wickets by now.

India: 73/6 after 26 overs (Rahane 17, Ashwin 7)

India need to find a way to rebuild. Easier said than done but they are in big, big trouble.

India: 62/6 after 24.2 overs (Rahane 13)

Curran strikes now. The ball was moving back into the right-hander but Karthik was a bit too loose with his technique and he paid the price. The inside edge crashed into the stumps. India may not make it to 100 here.

D Karthik b Curran 1 (3b)

India: 61/5 after 23.3 overs (Rahane 13)

WICKET! Once again, the Woakes-Buttler combo are at it. Buttler missed a simple chance off the second ball and then off the next ball, Woakes induced another edge. This time, Buttler held on. The very same thing happened for Kohli too.

H Pandya c Buttler b Woakes 11 (10b, 2x4)

India: 57/4 after 23 overs (Rahane 13, Pandya 7)

Curran getting a good inswinger going and Pandya almost inside-edged one back onto the stumps. The allrounder seems to be in a rush and he has been sent ahead of Karthik and Ashwin. Maybe Shastri and Kohli want him to shake things up a little.

India: 49/4 after 21.4 overs (Rahane 12)

WICKET! Genuine nick from Kohli’s bat off the third ball. It fell just short of Buttler in the slips but the next ball did the trick. Kohli was looking to play across the line to the leg-side but the ball moved, took the edge and Buttler, diving to his right, took a good catch.

V Kohli c Buttler b Woakes 24 (57b, 2x4)

India: 44/3 after 21 overs (Kohli 19, Rahane 11)

Another change – Sam Curran is into the attack now. Anderson gets a rest. Rahane picked up three runs with a nice, solid push down the ground. Curran’s line was a little off and India cashed in – they picked up 5 runs in the over!

India: 39/3 after 20 overs (Kohli 19, Rahane 7)

Woakes getting big movement. He induced a genuine edge from Kohli’s bat which dropped just short off the slips, then there was a play and a miss and another one that dropped short because Kohli was playing with soft hands. No breathing space for the Indian batsmen. The shape is very similar to Anderson and that only spells trouble.

India: 39/3 after 19 overs (Kohli 19, Rahane 7)

The battle continue. Kohli got three runs in the over – two off the first ball and a quick single off the last one. The Indian skipper seems to be settling down a little but it will be interesting to see how he faces up to Woakes.

India: 36/3 after 18 overs (Kohli 16, Rahane 7)

Chris Woakes is into the attack and he is getting a lovely shape away from the right-handers. He beat Rahane a couple of times and almost opened him up with every delivery. He starts off with a maiden.

India: 36/3 after 17 overs (Kohli 16, Rahane 7)

Two runs off the first ball and then a few more that went past the outside edge. Kohli is doing well to play inside the line of the ball. This is something that Marcus Trescothick used to do very well. So far, Kohli is showing great restraint and discipline.

India: 34/3 after 16 overs (Kohli 14, Rahane 7)

Rahane calls for a quick single but this time, as against the previous time, Kohli calls early and stays put in the crease. India cannot afford another run-out. They cannot afford another wicket. Two maidens on the trot and that means Anderson gets another go at Kohli in the next over. As always, a fascinating battle.

India: 34/3 after 15 overs (Kohli 14, Rahane 7)

Two wonderful deliveries from Anderson in this over to Kohli. The first one was full and tempted Kohli to shape up for the drive. Didn’t get bat on ball and it went through to the keeper. Kohli was cursing himself for attempting to play that shot but the length was too tempting. The next ball pitched in line with the off-stump and then moved again. Michael Holding, on air, called it a ‘leg-spinner.’

India: 34/3 after 14 overs (Kohli 14, Rahane 7)

The ball isn’t swinging as much as it was and India are taking a few singles here. A good thing too. The strike is being turned around and the bowlers don’t get too much time to attack one batsman.

After 13 overs, India 30/3

The ball is not swinging as much as it did early on, given it’s bright and sunny now. The England fielders furiously shining the ball. Just a couple of runs from that Anderson over.

After 12 overs, India 28/3 - DROPPED!

Rahane, standing outside the crease, gets his first boundary by caressing one through covers – that was all timing, and the ball races down the slope. But Rahane would do well to counter the ball that goes with the angle from Broad, managed to get his bat down in time twice to avoid being LBW.

Reprieve for Rahane off the last ball! He goes fishing at a full ball outside off, gets a thick edge and it’s put down! Quite close to Root’s right, he still went with a single hand presumably because of the pace with which it came at him. And it’s down.

After 11 overs, India 22/3

Kohli starts off with a lovely cover drive for four, but England wouldn’t mind seeing that. Anderson shortens his length and finds Kohli’s outside edge, but it’s played with lovely soft hands, well short of fifth slip. Kohli watchfully plays out the next couple of deliveries before getting a couple off the last ball, thanks to a healthy inside edge. Streaky.

After 10 overs, India 16/3

Tight bowling by Broad, keeps Kohli on his toes with a couple of good length deliveries on the middle stump, and Kohli can’t get off strike due to the fielder at short mid-wicket. The Indian captain takes a singe off the last ball and will now face Anderson... here we go again.

09:40 pm: Broad to Kohli...

After 9 overs, India 15/3

Anderson starts off with a peach of an outswinger that beats Rahane’s outside edge. Five slips in place! This is as testing as it gets for India...

09:37 pm: The players are out in the middle. We are minutes away from restart. Rahane and Kohli will try to resurrect what has been an abysmal start for India.

09:32 pm: Alright, we are 8 minutes away from resumption...

09:30 pm: Here’s something for you to read while we await an update...

09:20 pm: Apparently the inspection is already underway, 10 minutes earlier than expected. Good news, that.

Look at the weather right now... this is quite something, even by England weather’s unpredictability standards.

A new day has dawned

It’s bright, it’s sunny, it’s like it never rained at all. This is nuts.

We may still have some play today

It has been a crazy day already. But this is why the English are always talking about the weather.

Oh, well

Tea has been taken at Lord’s.

Rain, again

Alright then... play to resume at 8pm IST. No! It has started raining again. The cricket has simply had no luck.

The rain has stopped

The rain has stopped for now and there is going to be an inspection soon. Play can go on till 7.30 pm local time.

In case you missed the Pujara run-out

The day so far

Sunny. Cloudy. Wicket. Wicket. Rain. Sunny. Rain. Cloudy. Wicket. Rain.

What’s happening with Pujara?

Pujara’s last six Test innings:
1: Run-out
35: Caught
50: Caught
1: Caught
0: Run-out
19: Run-out

It is worrying to see how quickly his mental state has deteriorated. He no longer seems unflappable in the middle, he always seems to be searching for something. Did India really need that quick single? Just what was Pujara thinking?

Takes us back to an interview that Shastri gave before the start of the Test series to ESPNCricinfo:

“Pujara is an anchor. He has been one of the pillars of this batting line-up for a long time. You know what he does - he loves batting (smiles). We just want him to do it. Unfortunately, in South Africa he was run out a couple of times [in the same Test in Centurion]. That is something we don’t want. We don’t want him to be an Usain Bolt, we want him to be Pujara. Stay there at the crease. The last thing you want to do is give your wicket away to a run-out.”

India: 15/3 after 8.3 overs (Kohli 3)

RUN OUT! Worst possible dismissal. The batting conditions are bad as it is and now Pujara is run out. Pujara defended the ball set off for a single, Kohli responded and quickly came halfway down the pitch before suddenly stopping. Pujara, though, couldn’t stop. It was too late. They shared a glance and that was it.

Two balls before the wicket, the umpires sent the teams off. But even as the teams were going off, the rain stopped. The batsmen came back on and then the wicket fell. Terribly unfair on the batsmen but this is what it is to bat in England.

C Pujara run out (Pope) 1 (25b)

India: 15/2 after 8 overs (Pujara 1, Kohli 3)

And it is raining again. The umpires are in conversation and the ball is still moving around a fair bit. Just no rhythm to this innings. How much longer will play go on for?

06:07 pm: It’s sunny at the Lord’s now. The batsmen are out. England are out. Let us have some cricket. But there are some dark clouds around too.

05:51 pm: Fingers crossed. The rain has stopped. The covers are coming off.

05:30 pm: Well, that is quite the menu once again.

05:10 pm: Bad news... five minutes away from restart, it has started raining again. Early lunch has been taken. Going to be that sort of a day isn’t it?

05:08 pm: A quick data-check on Shikhar Dhawan in away Test tours. He doesn’t complete a full series...

05:01 pm: This is an astounding stat...

04:58 pm: A trip down memory lane...

It’s not just ‘Home of Cricket’. It’s also the venue where India’s Test cricket journey began all the way back in 1932. Led by the charismatic CK Nayudu, Indian cricket embarked on a journey that has now seen them play 523 Test matches.

Looking back at India’s most famous Test matches at Lord’s. Read here..

04:52 pm: Good news from Lord’s. Play to resume at 05:15 pm IST, lunch to be taken at 06:15 pm... now let’s hope the rain stays away a bit longer.

04:40 pm: Someone’s keeping himself busy...

04:30 pm: India’s opening partnerships overseas do not make for good reading... if Kohli and Shastri are serious about this team wanting to be known as good travellers, this is an area that needs immediate addressing.

India's Test opening partnership in last 5 yrs

Host Country Inns Runs Highest partnerhship
in Australia 8 248 56
in England 13 288 50
in South Africa 10 198 41
in New Zealand 4 49 36

Rain break

The drizzle has intensified. We’ve got proper rain now.

India: 11/2 after 6.3 overs (Pujara 1, Kohli 1)

Both openers back in a hut. A short session, a brilliant one for Anderson and that is all England needed to take control. Important question: Will Vijay be dropped in the next Test? Vinayakk Mohanarangan on the two dismissals we have seen so far:

No one wonder Kohli wanted to bowl first, then. With a bit of a rain around, Anderson becomes lethal. But anyone else think that was more of a poor shot by Vijay than a great ball by Anderson? It was a good ball, no doubt. But unplayable for an opening batsman who has experience of playing overseas? Not quite sure. Vijay got stuck at the crease to an over-pitched delivery, played with an angled bat and completely misread the delivery.

Like Atherton said on air, he was looking to flick that ball square in the first over instead of playing with a straight bat. That is just suicidal against Anderson – at Lord’s, with the new ball, of all places. Ganguly adds, “its a typical sub-continent shot.”

As for Rahul, it’s another opportunity missed. To be fair, the delivery he got was a bit more unplayable than the one Vijay got. It was a ball that only a supremely confident batsman would leave, with Anderson’s angle forcing him into playing a shot. The ball deviates just a little, and the edge is found.

India are yet again in trouble, and Kohli is into bat early.

India: 11/2 after 6.3 overs (Pujara 1, Kohli 1)

Played stopped due to rain. It isn’t heavy but the umpires probably thought this was too much in favour of the batsmen. But this is also why Root chose to bowl first – easier for a bowling side to find their rhythm than for a batting side.

India: 10/2 after 6.1 overs (Pujara 1)

It’s that man again. Anderson hangs one in the channel, Rahul pushes forward, goes searching, gets the edge and Bairstow takes a simple catch. Both of India’s openers are back in the hut and Kohli walks in.

KL Rahul c Bairstow b Anderson 8 (14b, 2x4)

India: 10/1 after 6 overs (KL Rahul 8, Pujara 1)

Lights are on. Every once in a while, the ball goes past the outside edge. That is the reality of life for a batsman in England. In 6 county matches, Pujara scored only 172 runs in 6 matches, 12 inngs, avg 14.33 , highest 41. It is not going to be easy and traditionally, it hasn’t been easy for Pujara in England.

India: 9/1 after 5 overs (KL Rahul 8, Pujara 1)

Last ball of the over was probably the first really poor ball of the innings. It was on the legs and Rahul helped himself to four runs in the fine leg region. Atherton keeps saying the key things is not go chasing for the ball.

India: 4/1 after 4 overs (KL Rahul 4, Pujara 0)

First runs, wonderful cover drive for four. Broad pitched it up and Rahul helped himself to four welcome runs. Nice applause. India are finally off the mark.

India: 0/1 after 3 overs (KL Rahul 0, Pujara 0)

Three overs, three maidens. England have made a wonderful start to the Test. Pujara and Rahul have a tough period to contend with. The lack of runs may not trouble Pujara as much as it will Rahul.

India: 0/1 after 2 overs (KL Rahul 0, Pujara 0)

A big Test for Pujara. He will have to not only blunt the new ball attack but also find a way to keep the scoreboard moving. If he doesn’t, KL Rahul might find his rhythm disrupted. Uneventful over from Broad, who is sharing the new ball with Anderson. While most are happy with India’s XI, there are some who feel India should’ve gone with another batsmen instead of a bowler. It may seem like a defensive option but perhaps India can get more out of Pandya the bowler?

India: 0/1 after 0.5 overs (KL Rahul 0)

WICKET! It took James Anderson just 5 balls to disturb the timber. Wonderful delivery, it was angled in but then straightened and hit the top of the off-stump. Nothing Vijay could’ve done about this. Stunning delivery. Pujara in next.

M Vijay b Anderson 0 (5b 0x4 0x6)

03:25 pm: It must seem odd to Ravindra Jadeja. He is the world’s No 3 Test bowler... higher than Ravichandran Ashwin (World No 5) but he doesn’t get picked for the squad and Kuldeep does. By the end of the ODI series, England were reading Kuldeep well and it will be interesting to see how this Test goes. The ‘England has too many left handers’ logic shouldn’t really apply.

03:19 pm: Probably the best XI India could have picked but now it is time for the batsmen to stand up and show what they are all about.

03:03 pm: England win toss and are going to bowl first.

Root: “Chris Woakes comes in. We did think about playing another spinner. But nice green tinge to the wicket. We are bowling first and we need to make the most of it.”

Virat: We would have bowled first as well. Bit of weather around as Joe said. But the wicket looks good – much better than Edgbaston. Pujara back for Dhawan. KL Rahul to open. Kuldeep Yadav comes in for Umesh Yadav. Mainly because Ashwin bowled well in the last game and we wanted to go at them with two quality spinners.”

02:41 pm: It is going to be that kind of day? The sun is out again.

02:39 pm: Many matches these days get over in 3-4 days and the loss of one day may not really hit the game in a big way. But if it continues to rain through the game, it just may...

02:23 pm: Oh no!

02:20 pm: The second day at Lord’s will be the first day of action...

Hello all and welcome to The Field’s live blog of the second day of the second Test, and the forecast, for now, looks like we will have the toss on time and play should go ahead at 03:30 pm IST as scheduled.

It was the first time a whole day’s Test play in England had been lost to bad weather since August 24 2013 when the fourth day of the fifth Ashes clash at The Oval was abandoned without a ball bowled.

The last time a day’s Test play was washed out completely at Lord’s came 17 years ago when the scheduled opening day of the first Test against Pakistan was abandoned on May 17 2001.

Officials later confirmed they would look to conduct the toss at 10:30am on Friday, with a view to an 11:00am start and that 98 overs, rather than the standard 90, would be scheduled for the second day in a bid to make-up lost playing time.

Support our journalism by subscribing to Scroll+ here. We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
Sponsored Content BY 

Swara Bhasker: Sharp objects has to be on the radar of every woman who is tired of being “nice”

The actress weighs in on what she loves about the show.

This article has been written by award-winning actor Swara Bhasker.

All women growing up in India, South Asia, or anywhere in the world frankly; will remember in some form or the other that gentle girlhood admonishing, “Nice girls don’t do that.” I kept recalling that gently reasoned reproach as I watched Sharp Objects (you can catch it on Hotstar Premium). Adapted from the author of Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn’s debut novel Sharp Objects has been directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, who has my heart since he gave us Big Little Lies. It stars the multiple-Oscar nominee Amy Adams, who delivers a searing performance as Camille Preaker; and Patricia Clarkson, who is magnetic as the dominating and dark Adora Crellin. As an actress myself, it felt great to watch a show driven by its female performers.

The series is woven around a troubled, alcohol-dependent, self-harming, female journalist Camille (single and in her thirties incidentally) who returns to the small town of her birth and childhood, Wind Gap, Missouri, to report on two similarly gruesome murders of teenage girls. While the series is a murder mystery, it equally delves into the psychology, not just of the principal characters, but also of the town, and thus a culture as a whole.

There is a lot that impresses in Sharp Objects — the manner in which the storytelling gently unwraps a plot that is dark, disturbing and shocking, the stellar and crafty control that Jean-Marc Vallée exercises on his narrative, the cinematography that is fluid and still manages to suggest that something sinister lurks within Wind Gap, the editing which keeps this narrative languid yet sharp and consistently evokes a haunting sensation.

Sharp Objects is also liberating (apart from its positive performance on Bechdel parameters) as content — for female actors and for audiences in giving us female centric and female driven shows that do not bear the burden of providing either role-models or even uplifting messages. 

Instead, it presents a world where women are dangerous and dysfunctional but very real — a world where women are neither pure victims, nor pure aggressors. A world where they occupy the grey areas, complex and contradictory as agents in a power play, in which they control some reigns too.

But to me personally, and perhaps to many young women viewers across the world, what makes Sharp Objects particularly impactful, perhaps almost poignant, is the manner in which it unravels the whole idea, the culture, the entire psychology of that childhood admonishment “Nice girls don’t do that.” Sharp Objects explores the sinister and dark possibilities of what the corollary of that thinking could be.

“Nice girls don’t do that.”

“Who does?”

“Bad girls.”

“So I’m a bad girl.”

“You shouldn’t be a bad girl.”

“Why not?”

“Bad girls get in trouble.”

“What trouble? What happens to bad girls?”

“Bad things.”

“What bad things?”

“Very bad things.”

“How bad?”

“Terrible!!!”

“Like what?”

“Like….”

A point the show makes early on is that both the victims of the introductory brutal murders were not your typically nice girly-girls. Camille, the traumatised protagonist carrying a burden from her past was herself not a nice girl. Amma, her deceptive half-sister manipulates the nice girl act to defy her controlling mother. But perhaps the most incisive critique on the whole ‘Be a nice girl’ culture, in fact the whole ‘nice’ culture — nice folks, nice manners, nice homes, nice towns — comes in the form of Adora’s character and the manner in which beneath the whole veneer of nice, a whole town is complicit in damning secrets and not-so-nice acts. At one point early on in the show, Adora tells her firstborn Camille, with whom she has a strained relationship (to put it mildly), “I just want things to be nice with us but maybe I don’t know how..” Interestingly it is this very notion of ‘nice’ that becomes the most oppressive and deceptive experience of young Camille, and later Amma’s growing years.

This ‘Culture of Nice’ is in fact the pervasive ‘Culture of Silence’ that women all over the world, particularly in India, are all too familiar with. 

It takes different forms, but always towards the same goal — to silence the not-so-nice details of what the experiences; sometimes intimate experiences of women might be. This Culture of Silence is propagated from the child’s earliest experience of being parented by society in general. Amongst the values that girls receive in our early years — apart from those of being obedient, dutiful, respectful, homely — we also receive the twin headed Chimera in the form of shame and guilt.

“Have some shame!”

“Oh for shame!”

“Shameless!”

“Shameful!”

“Ashamed.”

“Do not bring shame upon…”

Different phrases in different languages, but always with the same implication. Shameful things happen to girls who are not nice and that brings ‘shame’ on the family or everyone associated with the girl. And nice folks do not talk about these things. Nice folks go on as if nothing has happened.

It is this culture of silence that women across the world today, are calling out in many different ways. Whether it is the #MeToo movement or a show like Sharp Objects; or on a lighter and happier note, even a film like Veere Di Wedding punctures this culture of silence, quite simply by refusing to be silenced and saying the not-nice things, or depicting the so called ‘unspeakable’ things that could happen to girls. By talking about the unspeakable, you rob it of the power to shame you; you disallow the ‘Culture of Nice’ to erase your experience. You stand up for yourself and you build your own identity.

And this to me is the most liberating aspect of being an actor, and even just a girl at a time when shows like Sharp Objects and Big Little Lies (another great show on Hotstar Premium), and films like Veere Di Wedding and Anaarkali Of Aarah are being made.

The next time I hear someone say, “Nice girls don’t do that!”, I know what I’m going to say — I don’t give a shit about nice. I’m just a girl! And that’s okay!

Swara is a an award winning actor of the Hindi film industry. Her last few films, including Veere Di Wedding, Anaarkali of Aaraah and Nil Battey Sannata have earned her both critical and commercial success. Swara is an occasional writer of articles and opinion pieces. The occasions are frequent :).

Watch the trailer of Sharp Objects here:

Play

This article was published by the Scroll marketing team with Swara Bhasker on behalf of Hotstar Premium and not by the Scroll editorial team.