Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday announced the launch of a new design for the social media platform. The new design de-emphasises the news feed and also gets rid of the blue banner that has been present since Facebook was launched in 2004, Reuters reported.

Instead, Facebook will now focus on making groups more central to the social media network. It has redesigned the Groups tab to make personalised feed of activity available to users, the company said in a press release. It added that the new features help make group recommendations easier.

A screenshot of a new-look Facebook page after the social media company launched a new design on Tuesday.
A screenshot of a new-look Facebook page after the social media company launched a new design on Tuesday.

Facebook said it is also introducing health support groups, adding a template for employers in job groups, and a new chat feature in gaming groups. It announced a “Secret Crush” option for Facebook Dating and a Meet New Friends feature to help users connect with new people from shared communities such as a school, workplace or city. The new design showcases Facebook’s messaging app, online marketplace and video-on-demand site.

“As the world gets bigger and more connected, we need that sense of intimacy more than ever,” Zuckerberg said at Facebook’s annual F8 conference in San Jose, California. “That’s why I believe that the future is private. This is the next chapter for our services.”

This is how the Facebook app looks after the introduction of the new design.
This is how the Facebook app looks after the introduction of the new design.

“I know that we don’t exactly have the strongest reputation on privacy right now, to put it lightly,” he added. “We’ve shown time and again as a company that we have what it takes to evolve.”

Facebook said users will start seeing the changes in their mobile app right away, while the desktop version of the new site will be unveiled in a few months.

Zuckerberg had in March announced a new “privacy-focused vision” for the future after several data privacy controversies hit Facebook over the last year. “I believe we should be working towards a world where people can speak privately and live freely knowing that their information will only be seen by who they want to see it,” he said.