ideas of beauty

War of words: Why Miss Tibet is being trolled by traditionalists

The Miss Tibet pageant has always been dogged by controversy. This time, conservative Tibetans are criticising the beauty queen for not knowing their language.

Ever since Tenzing Sangnyi was crowned the new Miss Tibet three weeks ago, the petite 21-year-old from Manali has had a rough ride. Instead of being elevated to a role model for Tibetan women, as she had hoped to be, she has been relentlessly trolled for not knowing the Tibetan language.

“How can someone without basic language capacity be allowed to represent the beauty of Tibetan women?” howled one online commentator. “It is just [a] big joke and completely wrong...”

A Facebook comment by a Dolma Sachu MeY-LuNg read: “Your broken and mixed language doesn’t take you anywhere... If you can’t... [meet] the expectation of Tibetan people, you... [are] not Miss Tibet...”

The barrage of criticism drove Sangnyi to plead with her critics to recognise that she is the child of Tibetan refugees, reared in an environment where she does not get to interact with Tibetan speakers. Her appeal didn’t convince everyone. It did, however, close the chapter on another controversy around the Miss Tibet pageant. Till next year, perhaps.

Miss Tibet 2016 Tenzing Sangnyi posing before the Tibetan flag.
Miss Tibet 2016 Tenzing Sangnyi posing before the Tibetan flag.

Th pageant, organised every year in McLeodGanj, the headquarters of the Tibetan government-in-exile, has been embroiled in controversy almost since it started in 2002.

When Lobsang Wangyal, a photojournalist from Dharamsala, first suggested organising Miss Tibet, he was disparaged by community elders. They said it would give a bad name to McleodGanj, a place regarded as sacred by Tibetans because of the presence of their spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama.

Besides, the very idea of young women wearing bikinis and sashaying about in western attire sounded preposterous to a people whose women traditionally wear an ankle-length skirt called a chuba and a full-sleeved blouse.

Wangyal went ahead with the pageant anyway.

He insists the show is “a platform for drawing attention to the brilliance of Tibetan culture and lifestyle, while at the same time highlighting the hardships faced by the members of the community”. It is “more than just a beauty pageant where pretty females flutter down the ramp”, he said. “It is a political act whereby we celebrate our identity, culture and our proud tradition, our way of asserting we are a nation.”

The three-day event has a swimsuit round on Day 1, followed by a talk and talent round on Day 2. Four rounds, where the contestants appear in casual attire, evening gown, traditional attire and then answer questions, complete the grand finale on the last day.

“Isn’t it funny that in a show which aims at crowning mdzangs-ma, or an intelligent, brave and virtuous woman, and goes by the clichéd tagline of beauty with brains, the brains part hardly gets any attention till the penultimate day?” asked Kay Sang, co-founder of Tibetan Feminist Collective. “And that too in the form of well-rehearsed answers to generic questions, which are the hallmark of all such pageants.”

The grand finale.
The grand finale.

Perhaps it was the stigma built around the event, but for four times in its brief history, the contest managed to get only a single entry. Every time, the lone entrant walked away with the crown.

In 2004 and 2007, the beauty queens had to withdraw from international pageants at the eleventh hour owing to Chinese intervention. They were asked to change their sashes from “Miss Tibet” to “Miss Tibet-China” and, when they refused, they were unceremoniously sent back. In 2011, Miss Tibet Tenzin Yangkyi smartly avoided a confrontation with the organisers by citing her Swiss citizenship and donning a “Miss Swiss Tibet” sash.

The year Yangkyi won, Wangyal, often called the “Tibetan Donald Trump”, was accused of fudging the results to favour his chosen one. He refuted those allegations at first, saying that the score sheets had been stolen, but later admitted that the non-Tibetan judge’s scores carried only 25% weightage. With more than 75% of the score resting on him, he had effectively decided the outcome.

In 2012, the event had to be cancelled due to heightened tension in Tibet.

The four finalists in chuba, the traditional Tibetan attire.
The four finalists in chuba, the traditional Tibetan attire.

At least this year’s pageant started on a better note.

The grand finale had four contestants: Dechen Wangmo from Mussorie, Tenzin Dawa from New York, Tenzin Deckyi from Bylakuppe in Karnataka, and Tenzin Sangnye from Manali. Social acceptance was more forthcoming after pictures of the women and the pony-tailed organiser seeking the Dalai Lama’s blessings were widely shared over social media.

On June 5, at the Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts, a 2,000-strong audience cheered on, while Usha Dobhal, a holistic healing counsellor, and Sunita Singh, a yoga teacher, judged the four rounds. A silver crown for the winner sponsored by a local jeweller, a decent sound system sourced from neighbouring Pathankot and, above all, a cash prize of Rs 1 lakh sponsored by a Tibetan businessman in Delhi added to the frills.

Sangnyi won the crown, and then all hell broke loose. The conservatives among the Tibetan community who believe that a sound knowledge of Ü-Tsang should be a deciding factor in the event’s outcome shamed Sangnyi for her supposed handicap.

“I have been bullied online and made a mockery of,” she wrote on the Miss Tibet website and on her Facebook page. “Just like many of my Tibetan friends, I have had a tough journey being brought up in an environment where I did not have the chance to interact with Tibetan speakers.”

She added: “Having said that, I am confident that my shortcomings in language do not make me any less of a Tibetan. Instead of blaming me and my family, please encourage me in this wonderful journey to do something for my country.”

The four finalists and the organiser seek the Dalai Lama's blessings.
The four finalists and the organiser seek the Dalai Lama's blessings.

Several liberals in the community have come to Sangnyi’s defence, emphasising that most Tibetans under the age of 20 have grown up under diverse and difficult conditions. After their parents were forced to leave Tibet, some youngsters went to boarding schools, while others grew up in nations with no Tibetan settlements. It is therefore unfair to blame them for failing to preserve their language.

“Everywhere in the world, there is a threat to the mother tongue, as people migrate to countries under the influence of other majority language,” said Lhagyari Namgyal Dolkar, a member of the Tibetan parliament in exile. “So is the case with the precious Tibetan language in Tibet, India or anywhere across the world.”

A large number of Tibetan youth, both in their homeland under Chinese occupation and in the diaspora, cannot speak Tibetan. In such a case, is it right to impose a narrow view of the essence of being a Tibetan?

Jigme Ugen, a prominent activist based in the United States and a member of the Tibetan National Congress, agrees. “Let’s not fall into the white supremacist’s twisted narrative, where language is an indicator of authenticity,” he said.

“When one is willing to challenge their limitations to speak/read/write Tibetan, it is inspirational,” Ugen asserted. “That individual needs support and encouragement – and the entire community to be a teacher and a council.”

The crowning moment.
The crowning moment.
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Some of the worst decisions made in history

From the boardroom to the battlefield, bad decisions have been a recipe for disaster

On New Year’s Day, 1962, Dick Rowe, the official talent scout for Decca Records, went to office, little realising that this was to become one of the most notorious days in music history. He and producer Mike Smith had to audition bands and decide if any were good enough to be signed on to the record label. At 11:00 am, either Rowe or Smith, history is not sure who, listened a group of 4 boys who had driven for over 10 hours through a snowstorm from Liverpool, play 15 songs. After a long day spent listening to other bands, the Rowe-Smith duo signed on a local group that would be more cost effective. The band they rejected went on to become one of the greatest acts in musical history – The Beatles. However, in 1962, they were allegedly dismissed with the statement “Guitar groups are on the way out”.

Source: Wikimedia Commons
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Decca’s decision is a classic example of deciding based on biases and poor information. History is full of examples of poor decisions that have had far reaching and often disastrous consequences.

In the world of business, where decisions are usually made after much analysis, bad decisions have wiped out successful giants. Take the example of Kodak – a company that made a devastating wrong decision despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary. Everyone knows that Kodak couldn’t survive as digital photography replaced film. What is so ironic that Alanis Morissette could have sung about it, is that the digital camera was first invented by an engineer at Kodak as early as 1975. In 1981, an extensive study commissioned by Kodak showed that digital was likely to replace Kodak’s film camera business in about 10 years. Astonishingly, Kodak did not use this time to capitalise on their invention of digital cameras – rather they focused on making their film cameras even better. In 1996, they released a combined camera – the Advantix, which let users preview their shots digitally to decide which ones to print. Quite understandably, no one wanted to spend on printing when they could view, store and share photos digitally. The Advantix failed, but the company’s unwillingness to shift focus to digital technology continued. Kodak went from a 90% market share in US camera sales in 1976 to less than 10% in 2012, when it filed for bankruptcy. It sold off many of its biggest businesses and patents and is now a shell of its former self.

Source: Wikimedia Commons
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Few military blunders are as monumental as Napoleon’s decision to invade Russia. The military genius had conquered most of modern day Europe. However, Britain remained out of his grasp and so, he imposed a trade blockade against the island nation. But the Russia’s Czar Alexander I refused to comply due to its effect on Russian trade. To teach the Russians a lesson, Napolean assembled his Grand Armée – one of the largest forces to ever march on war. Estimates put it between 450,000 to 680,000 soldiers. Napoleon had been so successful because his army could live off the land i.e. forage and scavenge extensively to survive. This was successful in agriculture-rich and densely populated central Europe. The vast, barren lands of Russia were a different story altogether. The Russian army kept retreating further and further inland burning crops, cities and other resources in their wake to keep these from falling into French hands. A game of cat and mouse ensued with the French losing soldiers to disease, starvation and exhaustion. The first standoff between armies was the bloody Battle of Borodino which resulted in almost 70,000 casualties. Seven days later Napoleon marched into a Moscow that was a mere shell, burned and stripped of any supplies. No Russian delegation came to formally surrender. Faced with no provisions, diminished troops and a Russian force that refused to play by the rules, Napolean began the long retreat, back to France. His miseries hadn’t ended - his troops were attacked by fresh Russian forces and had to deal with the onset of an early winter. According to some, only 22,000 French troops made it back to France after the disastrous campaign.

Source: Wikimedia Commons
Source: Wikimedia Commons

When it comes to sports, few long time Indian cricket fans can remember the AustralAsia Cup final of 1986 without wincing. The stakes were extremely high – Pakistan had never won a major cricket tournament, the atmosphere at the Sharjah stadium was electric, the India-Pakistan rivalry at its height. Pakistan had one wicket in hand, with four runs required off one ball. And then the unthinkable happened – Chetan Sharma decided to bowl a Yorker. This is an extremely difficult ball to bowl, many of the best bowlers shy away from it especially in high pressure situations. A badly timed Yorker can morph into a full toss ball that can be easily played by the batsman. For Sharma who was then just 18 years old, this was an ambitious plan that went wrong. The ball emerged as a low full toss which Miandad smashed for a six, taking Pakistan to victory. Almost 30 years later, this ball is still the first thing Chetan Sharma is asked about when anyone meets him.

So, what leads to bad decisions? While these examples show the role of personal biases, inertia, imperfect information and overconfidence, bad advice can also lead to bad decisions. One of the worst things you can do when making an important decision is to make it on instinct or merely on someone’s suggestion, without arming yourself with the right information. That’s why Aegon Life puts the power in your hands, so you have all you need when choosing something as important as life insurance. The Aegon Life portal has enough information to help someone unfamiliar with insurance become an expert. So empower yourself with information today and avoid decisions based on bad advice. For more information on the iDecide campaign, see here.

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