News Brief

WHO releases first list of essential diagnostic tests to prevent incorrect diagnosis

The catalogue aims to diagnose the most common conditions as well as a number of global priority diseases.

The World Health Organisation on Tuesday released a list of essential diagnostic tests in a bid to prevent incorrect diagnosis. The catalogue, which will be updated on a regular basis, aims to diagnose common conditions as well as a number of global priority diseases.

“An accurate diagnosis is the first step to getting effective treatment,” said WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “No one should suffer or die because of a lack of diagnostic services, or because the right tests were not available.”

The database includes 113 tests with a focus on in vitro testing (tests of human specimens like blood and urine). The list specifies 58 tests for the detection and diagnosis of a wide range of common conditions and 55 tests for the “detection, diagnosis and monitoring of priority diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus, tuberculosis, malaria, hepatitis B and C, human papillomavirus and syphilis”.

WHO Assistant Director-General for Access to Medicines, Vaccines and Pharmaceuticals Mariângela Simão said: “Our other goal is to signal to countries and developers that the tests in the list must be of good quality, safe and affordable.”

The catalogue was created as a reference for governments to update or develop their own list of essential diagnostics, the organisation said.

Support our journalism by subscribing to Scroll+ here. We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
Sponsored Content BY 

Snippets of wisdom on the health care industry by Dr. Kevin Lofton

His sessions stressed on the importance of patient centric healthcare.

At the Hospital Leadership Summit 2017, Dr Kevin Lofton, CEO Catholic Health Initiatives, spoke on the need to focus on patient experience, the role of the leader and shared some ideas from the practices of his own hospital chain. Here are some snippets from Dr Lofton’s presentation that will provide some food for thought. The Bringing Health to Life content hub contains his and many other insights and best practices for healthcare delivery.

The two kinds of willing patients

During the summit, a consensus emerged that the health care industry needs to learn customer centricity from other industries. However, the health care industry is unique in several ways and one of the fundamental differences is the nature of its customer. Dr Lofton spoke about how the customer i.e. the patient in the health care industry is different by way of motivation. He reminded the gathering that nobody willingly seeks out a doctor.

Play

The paradigm shift needed in health care

Dr Lofton emphasised that patient centricity needs to become a part of the very philosophy of a health care facility, a philosophy that drives every action and motivates every employee in the organisation. He described this revaluation of purpose as a paradigm shift. Dr Lofton spoke about how patient centricity starts much before the patient walks into the hospital, that the patient’s tryst with the health care system starts before a visit to the doctor is warranted. In this clip, Dr Lofton provides an example of one such paradigm shift for health care providers.

Play

At the 2017 Hospital Leadership Summit, Dr Lofton shared several such insights from his experience in the US health care system. He emphasised especially on the need of empathy alongside clinical skill among health care providers.

For more insights and best practices for healthcare delivery, visit Abbott’s Bringing Health to Life portal.

This article was produced on behalf of Abbott by the Scroll.in marketing team and not by the Scroll.in editorial staff.