TV shows

Dreams of unborn babies and women who don’t exist in TV show ‘Falling Water’

The series has been created by the team behind ‘The Walking Dead’.

In the first scene of USA Network’s new show Falling Water, a woman dreams of being in labour and delivering a child that, she is told by the nursing staff, does not exist. Except this is not the first time she is having this dream, and the child she sees in it remains the same. The child also makes appearances in the dreams of two other people: a security officer for a Wall Street firm and a New York Police Department detective.

USA Network is the producer of the cult hit Mr Robot, and with Falling Water, the network is hoping for another success. Setting a sci-fi thriller in the land of dreams might just do the trick, its mix of intimacy and horror offering the kind of narrative tautness on which good television thrives.

Play
‘Falling Water’.

Tess (Lizzie Brochere) is the woman who dreams of her unborn child. She has a history of mental illness, related to an episode that has given her keen powers of perception. She is hired by consumer goods companies to spot the latest ideas before they become trends, and her record shows she is very good at her job. However, the central misery of her life is the dreams of the child and what they point towards.

Burton (David Ajala) works on Wall Street and is deputed to clean the mess after one of the partners at his firm kills himself because of faulty trading. A mysterious organisation called Topeka is believed to be involved, and it is left to Burton to ensure that the fallout of the scandal does not spread to his firm. Meanwhile, he is an avid walker of dream land himself, conducting a torrid, if mostly silent, relationship with a woman who too does not seem to exist in the real world.

The third arc belongs to Taka (Will Yun Lee), the police officer who is called upon to investigate the death of a woman whose house turns out to be the site of a mass cult suicide. When he first chances upon the dead bodies, Taka reads “Topeka” scrawled in bold letters on the walls of the house, giving readers hope of an interconnected mesh of stories that have a common core and, in all probability, resolution. Like the others, Taka too suffers privately: he has a catatonic mother who peoples his dreams along with the child from Tess’ dreams.

If all this sounds too confusing, it is not. The first season is 10 episodes long, and the two episodes broadcast thus far are engaging. The three central characters are charismatic performers who bring a pleasing vulnerability to the surreal goings-on around them. The series features a billionaire who is keen to commercialise what he sees as the vast potential of the interconnected real estate of our dreams, in a nice play on how the most preciously mysterious things become beholden to the idiosyncrasies of their age.

Created by the team behind HBO’s The Walking Dead, Falling Water makes for promising television even when the narrative crawls to a speed that may tax the most patient viewer. It is the kind of show – Twin Peaks is another example that comes to mind – that throws a bunch of annoyingly tangled narratives at you and then goes about untangling every knot to fashion a satisfying denouement. If viewers find the perseverance to sit through this exercise, they are likely to be rewarded.

Support our journalism by subscribing to Scroll+ here. We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
Sponsored Content BY 

Get ready for an 80-hour shopping marathon

Here are some tips that’ll help you take the lead.

Starting 16th July at 4:00pm, Flipkart will be hosting its Big Shopping Days sale over 3 days (till 19th July). This mega online shopping event is just what a sale should be, promising not just the best discounts but also buying options such as no cost EMIs, buyback guarantee and product exchanges. A shopping festival this big, packed with deals that you can’t get yourself to refuse, can get overwhelming. So don’t worry, we’re here to tell you why Big Shopping Days is the only sale you need, with these helpful hints and highlights.

Samsung Galaxy On Nxt (64 GB)

A host of entertainment options, latest security features and a 13 MP rear camera that has mastered light come packed in sleek metal unibody. The sale offers an almost 40% discount on the price. Moreover, there is a buyback guarantee which is part of the deal.

Original price: Rs. 17,900

Big Shopping Days price: Rs. 10,900

Samsung 32 inches HD Ready LED TV

Another blockbuster deal in the sale catalogue is this audio and visual delight. Apart from a discount of 41%, the deal promises no-cost EMIs up to 12 months.

Original price: Rs. 28,890

Big Shopping Days price: Rs. 10,900

Intel Core I3 equipped laptops

These laptops will make a thoughtful college send-off gift or any gift for that matter. Since the festive season is around the corner, you might want to make use of this sale to bring your A-game to family festivities.

Original price: Rs. 25,590

Big Shopping Days price: Rs. 21,900

Fashion

If you’ve been planning a mid-year wardrobe refresh, Flipkart’s got you covered. The Big Shopping Days offer 50% to 80% discount on men’s clothing. You can pick from a host of top brands including Adidas and Wrangler.

With more sale hours, Flipkart’s Big Shopping Days sale ensures we can spend more time perusing and purchasing these deals. Apart from the above-mentioned products, you can expect up to 80% discount across categories including mobiles, appliances, electronics, fashion, beauty, home and furniture.

Features like blockbuster deals that are refreshed every 8 hours along with a price crash, rush hour deals from 4-6 PM on the starting day and first-time product discounts makes this a shopping experience that will have you exclaiming “Sale ho to aisi! (warna na ho)”

Set your reminders and mark your calendar, Flipkart’s Big Shopping Days starts 16th July, 4 PM and end on 19th July. To participate in 80 hours of shopping madness, click here.

Play

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of Flipkart and not by the Scroll editorial team.