Movie trailers

Trailer talk: ‘Noor’, ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’, ‘Maatr’

Also opening this week: ‘Sonata’ and ‘Unforgettable’.

As cinemas await the second and final Baahubali movie, a handful of films to pass the time, including two book adaptations and two revenge thrillers.

Noor Sunhil Sippy’s adaptation of Saba Imtiaz’s bestseller Karachi, You’re Killing Me! transports the action from the Pakistani port city to its Western Indian cousin. Journalist Noor (Sonakshi Sinha) goes from one assignment to the next while trying to find the perfect man. Also starring Purab Kohli and Kanan Gill.

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Noor.

Maatr Raveena Tandon plays a grieving mother who subjects her daughter’s rapists to spectacular punishment. Directed by Ashtar Syed, the movie is set in Delhi and co-stars Rushad Rana, Anurag Arora and Madhur Mittal.

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Maatr.

The Zookeeper’s Wife Diane Ackerman’s movie-ready novel The Zookeeper’s Wife is about the heroic efforts of a Polish couple to save Jews fleeing Nazi persecution during World War II. The Zabinskis ran a menagerie as well as a secret shelter for Polish Jews until the end of the war. In the movie adaptation, Jessica Chastain plays Antonina Zabinski, Johan Heldenbergh plays her husband Jan, while Daniel Bruhl is the Nazi officer.

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The Zookeeper’s Wife.

Unforgettable Katherine Heigl’s image makeover sees her as the vengeful ex-wife who stalks her husband and his new partner (Rosaria Dawson). Hollywood producer Denise Di Novi makes her directorial debut with the movie.

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Unforgettable.

Ek Thi Rani Aisi Bhi Gul Bahar Singh’s long-delayed biopic is finally being released. Produced by the Rajmata Vijayaraje Scindia Smriti Trust, the movie traces the Gwalior ex-royal’s political journey and her strained relationship with her son Madhavrao. Hema Malini plays Vijaya Raje Scindia, while Rajesh Shringapure plays Madhavrao.

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Ek Thi Rani Aisi Bhi.

Sonata Aparna Sen’s English language movie is an adaptation of the Mahesh Elkunchwar play of the same name. As two long-time flatmates (played by Sen and Shabana Azmi) await a visit from another old friend, Subhadra (Lilette Dubey), old and new memories and wounds emerge.

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Sonata.

Smurfs: The Lost Village A map leads Smurfette (voiced by Demi Lovato), Brainy (Danny Pudi), Clumsy (Jack McBtayer), and Hefty (Joe Manganiello) to a lost village. Also in pursuit is the evil wizard Gargamel (voiced by Rainn Wilson).

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Smurfs: The Lost Village.
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