Photo feature

Why did the EC set up an entire polling booth just for this man?

And it's done so four times before.

Bharatdas Darshandas lives in solitary splendor in an ashram in Banej, 20 km deep in Gujarat’s Gir forest. On Wednesday, a clutch of five Election Commission officials and a policeman gathered at a watchpost deep in the jungle to transform it into a polling booth solely to cater to the 65-year-old priest. Election regulations require that voters should not have to travel more than 2 km to cast their ballot, so all these staff had been mobilised to ensure that one man could participate in the world’s biggest democratic exercise.


Darshandas – or Bapu, as he prefers to be called – is no stranger to this kind of attention. The EC has set up this booth solely for him four times before.

On polling day, Bapu took his time getting to the station, so officials instructed journalists who gathered to witness the event to go off to shoot the lions in the interim. The forest, after all, is the last home of the Asiatic lion.


Near the post, officials had set up a pole with several rough-hewn plastic boxes on it, each with a mobile phone inside. Each box was in a different colour, each representing a different network. For some reason, officials said that the phones wouldn’t work unless they were placed in the boxes.


Just past 9.30 am, Bapu made his appearance, followed by a TV camera. But the officials wouldn’t let the crew into the booth to shoot Bapu voting and an argument broke out. Bapu waited patiently, watching the squabble. In the end, the crew gave up, and Bapu went inside to cast his vote. He came out to declare that Banej had now cast 100% of its votes and that he could confirm that to the world.


He returned to his ashram, where he has lived since 2000, crossing a stream he called Choti Ganga. His only companions are two pet peacocks, Sonu and Monu. But it’s less lonely than you’d imagine. Other sadhus sometimes drop by to stay with him. Tourists out spotting lions often stop by his shrine. On Shiv Ratri, he gets as many as 4,000 pilgrims.

Back home, Bapu revealed that he’d voted for the Bhartiya Janta Party. If the party comes to power, he expects it to give him money to renovate his temple. After that’s done, he wants to start charging visitors to stay in ashram, just the way the forest department charges tourists to enter the forest.


 
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The incredible engineering that can save your life in a car crash

Indian roads are among the world’s most dangerous. We take a look at the essential car safety features for our road conditions.

Over 200,000 people die on India’s roads every year. While many of these accidents can be prevented by following road safety rules, car manufacturers are also devising innovative new technology to make vehicles safer than ever before. To understand how crucial this technology is to your safety, it’s important to understand the anatomy of a car accident.

Source: Global report on road safety, 2015 by WHO.
Source: Global report on road safety, 2015 by WHO.

A car crash typically has three stages. The first stage is where the car collides with an object. At the point of collision, the velocity with which the car is travelling gets absorbed within the car, which brings it to a halt. Car manufacturers have incorporated many advanced features in their cars to prevent their occupants from ever encountering this stage.

Sixth sense on wheels

To begin with, some state-of-the-art vehicles have fatigue detection systems that evaluate steering wheel movements along with other signals in the vehicle to indicate possible driver fatigue–one of the biggest causes of accidents. The Electronic Stability Program (ESP) is the other big innovation that can prevent collisions. ESP typically encompasses two safety systems–ABS (anti-lock braking system), and TCS (traction control system). Both work in tandem to help the driver control the car on tricky surfaces and in near-collision situations. ABS prevents wheels from locking during an emergency stop or on a slippery surface, and TCS prevents the wheels from spinning when accelerating by constantly monitoring the speed of the wheels.

Smarter bodies, safer passengers

In the event of an actual car crash, manufacturers have been redesigning the car body to offer optimal protection to passengers. A key element of newer car designs includes better crumple zones. These are regions which deform and absorb the impact of the crash before it reaches the occupants. Crumple zones are located in the front and rear of vehicles and some car manufacturers have also incorporated side impact bars that increase the stiffness of the doors and provide tougher resistance to crashes.

CRUMPLE ZONES: Invented in the 1950s, crumple zones are softer vehicle sections that surround a safety cell that houses passengers. In a crash, these zones deform and crumple to absorb the shock of the impact. In the visual, the safety cell is depicted in red, while the crumple zones of the car surround the safety cell.
CRUMPLE ZONES: Invented in the 1950s, crumple zones are softer vehicle sections that surround a safety cell that houses passengers. In a crash, these zones deform and crumple to absorb the shock of the impact. In the visual, the safety cell is depicted in red, while the crumple zones of the car surround the safety cell.

Post-collision technology

While engineers try to mitigate the effects of a crash in the first stage itself, there are also safe guards for the second stage, when after a collision the passengers are in danger of hitting the interiors of the car as it rapidly comes to a halt. The most effective of these post-crash safety engineering solutions is the seat belt that can reduce the risk of death by 50%.

In the third stage of an actual crash, the rapid deceleration and shock caused by the colliding vehicle can cause internal organ damage. Manufacturers have created airbags to reduce this risk. Airbags are installed in the front of the car and have crash sensors that activate and inflate it within 40 milliseconds. Many cars also have airbags integrated in the sides of the vehicles to protect from side impacts.

SEATBELTS: Wearing seatbelts first became mandatory in Victoria, Australia in 1970, and is now common across the world. Modern seatbelts absorb impact more efficiently, and are equipped with ‘pre-tensioners’ that pull the belt tight to prevent the passenger from jerking forward in a crash.
SEATBELTS: Wearing seatbelts first became mandatory in Victoria, Australia in 1970, and is now common across the world. Modern seatbelts absorb impact more efficiently, and are equipped with ‘pre-tensioners’ that pull the belt tight to prevent the passenger from jerking forward in a crash.

Safety first

In the West as well as in emerging markets like China, car accident related fatalities are much lower than in India. Following traffic rules and driving while fully alert remain the biggest insurance against mishaps, however it is also worthwhile to fully understand the new technologies that afford additional safety.

So the next time you’re out looking for a car, it may be a wise choice to pick an extra airbag over custom leather seats or a swanky music system. It may just save your life.

Equipped with state-of-the-art passenger protection systems like ESP and fatigue detection systems, along with high-quality airbags and seatbelts, all Volkswagen cars have the safety of passengers at the heart of their design. Watch Volkswagen customer stories and driver experiences that testify its superior German engineering, here.

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This article was produced on behalf of Volkswagen by the Scroll.in marketing team and not by the Scroll.in editorial staff.

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