Letters to the editor

Readers' comments: 'We Indians have a weird and twisted idea of nationalism'

A selection of readers' opinions.

Tricolour trouble

I am glad Anjali Mody laid bare the hollowness of this newfound so-called nationalism of this government and its abusive anonymous social media mafia (“Forget Amazon Canada. Who’s outraging against the daily insults to the national flag in India?”). We are desecrating the Indian flag everyday. Crooks of every hue – including ministers, politicians, bureaucrats, security forces, traders, businessmen, common people – indulge in various corrupt practices or unlawful activities under the shadow of our national flag, which is furled every morning in every government offices across the country. We Indians do have a weird and twisted idea of nationalism. Kujurbachchan

***

This is a wonderful view. We are enraged by the fact that our country flag has been used by Amazon to create a doormat. We got enraged when Aamir Khan spoke of intolerance in India. We get enraged by the fact that Modi’s demonetisation has caused loss of lives.

On January 26 and August 15, we put up posts saying: “I’m proud to be an Indian.” I want to ask: Are you really proud to be an Indian? If you are, then why are you not helping India develop? Are you worried that you cannot bring the change? It takes one person to start a revolution. Why can’t that one person be you?

We have a lot of people in India, whose idea in life is to go abroad, do higher studies, get a job there and earn money. If all of us leave India, who will stay here?

I’m proud of India’s great heritage. But I’m not proud of India. I’m not proud of the way it has become. I’m not proud of the country we have turned it into. It’s time we start the change. It’s time we start reviving India.

This is just my view. I am not anti-nationalist. I am just fed up with the various things around me and I am working on various things that would help change the system – at least its worth a shot. – Surya Teja

***

We Indians seem to have become extremely sensitive, more so in current times, when hyper nationalism is in fashion. The world must be laughing at us, more so because a union minister chose to intervene in this matter, and that too on Twitter! Michael Douglas’ final speech in The American President lays out the stark contrast between the American concept of freedom in the context of the national flag and ours. – Arnab Basak

***

Things that are taboo in a particular society may be perfectly normal in another (“The Daily Fix: Sushma Swaraj threat to Amazon shows how governance is becoming a social media event”). The concern of the minister may have been genuine but the response was inappropriate. Social media may have played a role in her being reactive. Reasoning gets diminished in such circumstances, or even dismissed outright. –Karthik

On the front

The government and military personnel will definitely try and find faults with the soldier (“Lost in the din of a BSF constable’s viral videos – a serious breach of service rules”). If he was so much trouble and had so many issues, why was he still in the forces?

Can our country be defended by people with psychological problems? Who are the armed forces trying to fool, now that the truth is out? We have to accept that there is corruption. Governments are only interested in winning elections by promising people the world. Once elected, however, they conveniently forget those promises. There is absolute no political will to do any good. The soldier is asking the State to fulfill his basic needs, not for gold or silver. Kudos to him for being brave and bold. – Dorothy Mascarenhas

***

It is true that armed forces need to maintain discipline. However to ill-treat jawans, using them as personal servants, not giving them their due – which includes proper nutrition – is highly condemnable. –Sanjeev

Marooned state

The Manipur chief minister has failed on all counts (“Imphal impasse: Manipur has quietly completed 70 days of blockade, with no end in sight”). Militants outfits are his vote bank and they have managed to keep him in his position by gun power and threatening the innocent.

Corruption, extortion and crime are every where. Manipur needs to be revolutionised. The Kukis got what they asked. The Naga demand should also be met. Without it, Manipuris will suffer. The Centre is not going to care because Manipur does not contribute to the economy of India. So it’s better for Manipuris to listen to the Naga demand. Only then will peace prevail in the North East. – Prem George!

Women’s safety

I think society at large is as to blamed for what happened on New Year’s Eve in Bengaluru (“Was it mass molestation? Debate rages over what happened in Bengaluru on New Year’s Eve”). Fault lies in the mentality of the people who think they can molest and rape women, in the government for not having strict laws to deal with such cases and with local authorities in not ensuring safety.

What happened in Kamanahalli is well known. Kamanahalli is one of the happening places in the city, with a host of restaurants. It also happens to be a sophisticated residential area. But most of the roads do not have street lights they are not used. I don’t know why.

Though darkness is not a reason to molest anyone, a brightly lit area will make people feel safer. I hope the local authorities start putting up more street lights and everyone works towards reducing such incidents by trying to change the mentality of people. – Jennifer Hanna Charles

***

Instead of blaming upbringing, education and the like, let us analyse the situation. There were 1,500 policemen and 50,000 revellers more than half of them with a blood alcohol concentration of around 0.10-0.125. What happens at this level? Loss of good judgement, impaired motor coordination, slurred speech as well as impaired balance, vision and hearing. Is there a rule against getting drunk? No. Can a bartender refuse refuse drinks? No. With this blood alcohol concentration, revellers become Bollywood heroes. So blame drinks and Bollywood, nobody else. – Shanthi Chandrasekhara

Overlooked crime

It is outrageous and shocking that the state and civil society turns a blind eye to this kind of violence against women (“Chhattisgarh must identify and prosecute policemen who raped 16 women, demand activists”). The perpetrators of such crimes must be brought to book and shamed. Adivasi land and culture need to be protected from such inhuman onslaughts. Thank you Scroll.in for consistently covering this issue. – Shikha Bhattacharji

Master of contradictions

Modi is the master of doing the undoable (“First Person: ‘I voted for Modi for change but not for hatred’”). If you say don’t keep corrupt ministers, he’ll confirm them. If you say don’t demonetise without having full knowledge of it, he’ll implement the move. If you ask him not to be hasty in presenting the budget after so much damage has been done by demonetisation, he’ll relish doing that. He’s the master of contradictions.

Mythology revisited

Kavita Kane has added a feminist perspective to the study of Indian mythology by reimagining the women of traditional mythology: Laxmana’s wife Urmila in Sita’s Sister, Uruvi in Karna’s Wife, Menaka in Menaka’s Choice, and presently Surpanakha, in The Princess of Lanka, as a woman with the strength of intellect and emotion (“Ramayana reimagined: Was Ravan actually in love with Sita?”). In her works, these characters appear in a new light, quite different from the way they were presented in the original texts. Kavita Kane gifts them voices of their own. – Joysree Das

Old-school

I respect your concern and interest in publishing the article regarding the Mantra Mangalya, professed by the great Kannada poet Kuvempu (“Why I chose a green wedding, recommended by a Kannada writer in 1966”). However, according to my knowledge, a lot of things the couple here claims to have done, like finding an auspicious day, time and place, were in fact opposed by Kuvempu and were some of the reasons why he professed this method. I might sound like a purist, but this particular example might be counter productive to what Kuvempu intended to do. So it would be better in the future if you could please consult respected scholars before publishing such region- and culture-specific articles. – Sathwik NN

Taking the stage

I found Rahul Gandhi’s speech calmly inspiring (“Playing the mimic: Rahul Gandhi just took a leaf out of Narendra Modi’s book”). I especially liked the part (that the Scroll.in article forgets to highlight) where he outlined the difference of ideology between the Congress and the Sangh Parivar (fear not vs frighten all).

And no, it isn’t anything like Modi’s speech. Modi mixes half-truths with crude and loud language to ridicule people. Rarely is there anything intellectually appealing in any of his speeches. Congress leaders, including Rahul Gandhi, rarely directly attack other politicians until there is real cause. The sarcastic comments on Modi were justified, because he not only bungled up the whole demonestisation exercise but has also tried to fudge the truth about it. – Shabeer

***

We were all trembling at the very thought of Rahul Gandhi causing an earthquake – but what we got instead was a taste of a budding stand-up comic! – Raghavendra Pattabhi

We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
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Most of these tech enabled solutions have emerged as hospitals look for better ways to enhance patient experience – one of the top criteria in evaluating hospital performance. Patient experience accounts for 25% of a hospital’s Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) score as per the US government’s Centres for Medicare and Mediaid Services (CMS) programme. As a Mckinsey report says, hospitals need to break down a patient’s journey into various aspects, clinical and non-clinical, and seek ways of improving every touch point in the journey. As hospitals also need to focus on delivering quality healthcare, they are increasingly collaborating with entrepreneurs who offer such patient centric solutions or encouraging innovative intrapreneurship within the organization.

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Getting the best from collaborations

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Meena Ganesh shares a similar view when she says that entrepreneurs offer an outsider’s fresh perspective on the existing gaps in healthcare. They are therefore better equipped to offer disruptive technology solutions that put the customer right at the center. Her own venture, Portea Medical, was born out of a need in the hitherto unaddressed area of patient experience – quality home care.

There are enough examples of hospitals that have gained significantly by partnering with or investing in such ventures. For example, the Children’s Medical Centre in Dallas actively invests in tech startups to offer better care to its patients. One such startup produces sensors smaller than a grain of sand, that can be embedded in pills to alert caregivers if a medication has been taken or not. Another app delivers care givers at customers’ door step for check-ups. Providence St Joseph’s Health, that has medical centres across the U.S., has invested in a range of startups that address different patient needs – from patient feedback and wearable monitoring devices to remote video interpretation and surgical blood loss monitoring. UNC Hospital in North Carolina uses a change management platform developed by a startup in order to improve patient experience at its Emergency and Dermatology departments. The platform essentially comes with a friendly and non-intrusive way to gather patient feedback.

When intrapreneurship can lead to patient centric innovation

Hospitals can also encourage a culture of intrapreneurship within the organization. According to Meena Ganesh, this would mean building a ‘listening organization’ because as she says, listening and being open to new ideas leads to innovation. Santosh Desai, MD& CEO - Future Brands Ltd, who was also part of the panel discussion, feels that most innovations are a result of looking at “large cultural shifts, outside the frame of narrow business”. So hospitals will need to encourage enterprising professionals in the organization to observe behavior trends as part of the ideation process. Also, as Dr Ram Narain, Executive Director, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, points out, they will need to tell the employees who have the potential to drive innovative initiatives, “Do not fail, but if you fail, we still back you.” Innovative companies such as Google actively follow this practice, allowing employees to pick projects they are passionate about and work on them to deliver fresh solutions.

Realizing the need to encourage new ideas among employees to enhance patient experience, many healthcare enterprises are instituting innovative strategies. Henry Ford System, for example, began a system of rewarding great employee ideas. One internal contest was around clinical applications for wearable technology. The incentive was particularly attractive – a cash prize of $ 10,000 to the winners. Not surprisingly, the employees came up with some very innovative ideas that included: a system to record mobility of acute care patients through wearable trackers, health reminder system for elderly patients and mobile game interface with activity trackers to encourage children towards exercising. The employees admitted later that the exercise was so interesting that they would have participated in it even without a cash prize incentive.

Another example is Penn Medicine in Philadelphia which launched an ‘innovation tournament’ across the organization as part of its efforts to improve patient care. Participants worked with professors from Wharton Business School to prepare for the ideas challenge. More than 1,750 ideas were submitted by 1,400 participants, out of which 10 were selected. The focus was on getting ideas around the front end and some of the submitted ideas included:

  • Check-out management: Exclusive waiting rooms with TV, Internet and other facilities for patients waiting to be discharged so as to reduce space congestion and make their waiting time more comfortable.
  • Space for emotional privacy: An exclusive and friendly space for individuals and families to mourn the loss of dear ones in private.
  • Online patient organizer: A web based app that helps first time patients prepare better for their appointment by providing check lists for documents, medicines, etc to be carried and giving information regarding the hospital navigation, the consulting doctor etc.
  • Help for non-English speakers: Iconography cards to help non-English speaking patients express themselves and seek help in case of emergencies or other situations.

As Arlen Meyers, MD, President and CEO of the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, says in a report, although many good ideas come from the front line, physicians must also be encouraged to think innovatively about patient experience. An academic study also builds a strong case to encourage intrapreneurship among nurses. Given they comprise a large part of the front-line staff for healthcare delivery, nurses should also be given the freedom to create and design innovative systems for improving patient experience.

According to a Harvard Business Review article quoted in a university study, employees who have the potential to be intrapreneurs, show some marked characteristics. These include a sense of ownership, perseverance, emotional intelligence and the ability to look at the big picture along with the desire, and ideas, to improve it. But trust and support of the management is essential to bringing out and taking the ideas forward.

Creating an environment conducive to innovation is the first step to bringing about innovation-driven outcomes. These were just some of the insights on healthcare management gleaned from the Hospital Leadership Summit hosted by Abbott. In over 150 countries, Abbott, which is among the top 100 global innovator companies, is working with hospitals and healthcare professionals to improve the quality of health services.

To read more content on best practices for hospital leaders, visit Abbott’s Bringing Health to Life portal here.

This article was produced on behalf of Abbott by the Scroll.in marketing team and not by the Scroll.in editorial staff.