TENNIS

Federer replaces Nadal at the top of ATP rankings; Kvitova moves up to eighth after Madrid win

Federer returns to the top spot despite not having played since March.

Rafael Nadal’s surprise quarter-final exit at the Madrid Masters has seen the Spaniard replaced as world number one by Roger Federer in the latest ATP rankings published on Monday.

Federer returns to the top spot despite not having played since March.

Former world No. 1 Novak Djokovic slipped six places to 18th after his second round defeat in Madrid, his lowest ranking since October 2006.

Madrid winner Alexander Zverev remains in third, but the man he beat in Sunday’s final, Dominic Thiem, dropped a place to eighth despite knocking out Nadal on his way to facing Zverev.

Thiem saw off Kevin Anderson in the semi-finals and it is the South African who inherits his seventh spot, the 31-year-old’s highest ever ranking.

The highest mover in the men’s charts is Madrid semi-finalist Denis Shapovalov with the Russian teenager jumping 14 rungs to a best ever 29th.

ATP rankings as of May 14:

1. Roger Federer (SUI) 8,670 pts (+1)

2. Rafael Nadal (ESP) 7,950 (-1)

3. Alexander Zverev (GER) 6,015

4. Grigor Dimitrov (BUL) 4,870

5. Marin Cilic (CRO) 4,770

6. Juan Martin Del Potro (ARG) 4,540

7. Kevin Anderson (RSA) 3,660 (+1)

8. Dominic Thiem (AUT) 3,545 (-1)

9. John Isner (USA) 3,305

10. David Goffin (BEL) 2,930

Kvitova moves up after Madrid triumph

Czech Petra Kvitova jumped two spots to eighth in the latest WTA rankings released Monday after beating Kiki Bertens to win the Madrid Open for the third time on the weekend.

Kvitova, who was also the champion in Madrid in 2011 and 2015, has now claimed four titles in 2018 after triumphs in St Petersburg, Doha and Prague.

Losing Madrid finalist Bertens shot up five places to 15th, while Russian Maria Sharapova’s quarter-final showing meant she went up 12 spots to 40th in the rankings headed by Romania’s Simona Halep, Dane Caroline Wozniacki and Spaniard Garbine Muguruza.

WTA rankings as of May 14

1. Simona Halep (ROM) 7,270 pts

2. Caroline Wozniacki (DEN) 6,845

3. Garbine Muguruza (ESP) 6,175

4. Elina Svitolina (UKR) 5,505

5. Karolina Pliskova (CZE) 5,425 (+1)

6. Jelena Ostapenko (LAT) 5,282 (-1)

7. Caroline Garcia (FRA) 5,080

8. Petra Kvitova (CZE) 4,550 (+2)

9. Venus Williams (USA) 4,286 (-1)

10. Sloane Stephens (USA) 4,059 (-1)

(With AFP inputs)

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