FIFA World Cup

World Cup: Yerry Mina takes Colombia top of Group G, Senegal knocked out on fair-play record

It’s the first time in history a team is knocked out based on their yellow card count.

A powerful header from Barcelona’s Yerry Mina fired Colombia into the last 16 of the World Cup with a 1-0 win over Group H rivals Senegal, who crashed out due to a poorer disciplinary record than Japan.

Colombia and Japan will play either England or Belgium, who were playing later Thursday.

The South Americans, looking to reach the latter stages after reaching the quarter-finals in Brazil, risked going out of the tournament at the first hurdle.

But after seeing the video assistant referee come to their rescue in a disappointing first half, Colombia were handed a last-16 lifeline 13 minutes from the end when Mina rose to meet a corner from the right and direct a header into the roof of Khadim Ndiaye’s net.

Poland’s 1-0 consolation win over Japan meant the Asians finished level with Senegal, who were agonisingly eliminated because they were issued six yellow cards in the competition, two more than Japan.

In Samara, Colombia coach Jose Pekerman kept faith with the attacking front line that thumped Poland 3-0, with midfielders Juan Quintero, James Rodriguez and Juan Cuadrado providing the support for striker Radamel Falcao up front.

But by the end of an entertaining first half, Pekerman was forced to tinker when Rodriguez was forced off with an injury problem and replaced by Luis Muriel.

Before then, Senegal had shown attacking potency but, all too often, failed to threaten David Ospina’s goal.

Colombia’s best first-half chance came from a free-kick that saw Ndiaye dive to parry Juan Quintero’s powerful effort after Falcao had been sandwiched in mid-air.

Yet Colombia lacked pace and punch, and the trickery of Juan Cuadrado, so effective against Poland, failed to impress Senegal as they caught the Juventus man out more than once.

When Cuadrado lost possession cheaply at the halfway line, Keita Balde sent Sadio Mane on his way towards goal before the Liverpool man fell under a challenge from defender Davinson Sanchez.

Serbian referee Milorad Mazic pointed to the spot but amid Colombian protests he was called to consult the VAR, which showed Sanchez’s boot had made contact with the ball first.

From another free kick Falcao was flagged offside when he headed Quintero’s floated delivery high and wide.

Senegal responded, but Keita shot straight at Ospina after the ‘keeper had spilled a powerful drive by Mane.

There was excitement among the Colombian fans when they learned Poland had scored against Japan, but Los Cafeteros struggled to do their bit.

Hopes were raised when Quintero’s powerful free kick from the right was blocked in the area and fell to Muriel, whose shot was deflected out. From the corner, Falcao’s header was bundled wide.

Penalty claims were waved away when Muriel fell dramatically under a challenge by Ndiaye as the ‘keeper rushed out to close him down.

But the Samara stadium erupted as Colombia finally broke the deadlock.

Cuadrado’s attempt to dribble into the area earned a corner, and Barcelona defender Mina rose highest to flash a header downwards that bounced up into the top of Ndiaye’s net on 77 minutes.

Senegal rallied in the closing minutes and it took a series of great saves by Arsenal shot-stopped Ospina to keep Colombia in the tournament.

Support our journalism by subscribing to Scroll+ here. We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.
Sponsored Content BY 

Expressing grief can take on creative forms

Even the most intense feelings of loss can be accompanied by the need to celebrate memories, as this new project shows.

Grief is a universal emotion and yet is one of the most personal experiences. Different people have their own individual ways of dealing with grief. And when it comes to grief that emerges from the loss of a loved one, it too can manifest in myriad ways.

Moving on from grief into a more life-affirming state is the natural human inclination. Various studies point to some commonly experienced stages of grieving. These include numbness, pining, despair and reorganization. Psychologist J.W. Worden’s 4-stage model for mourning includes accepting the reality of loss, working through the pain, adjusting to life without the deceased and maintaining a connection with the deceased, while moving on. Central to these healing processes would be finding healthy ways of expressing grief and being able to articulate the void they feel.

But just as there is no one way in which people experience grief, there is also no one common way in which they express their grief. Some seek solace from talking it out, while some through their work and a few others through physical activities. A few also seek strength from creative self-expressions. Some of the most moving pieces of art, literature and entertainment have in fact stemmed from the innate human need to express emotions, particularly grief and loss.

As a tribute to this universal human need to express the grief of loss, HDFC Life has initiated the Memory Project. The initiative invites people to commemorate the memory of their loved ones through music, art and poetry. The spirit of the project is captured in a video in which people from diverse walks of life share their journey of grieving after the loss of a loved one.

The film captures how individuals use creative tools to help themselves heal. Ankita Chawla, a writer featured in the video, leans on powerful words to convey her feelings for her father who is no more. Then there is Aarifah, who picked up the guitar, strummed her feelings and sang “let’s not slow down boy, we’re perfectly on time”, a line from a song she wrote for her departed love. Comedian Neville Shah addresses his late mother in succinct words, true to his style, while rapper Prabhdeep Singh seeks to celebrate the memory of his late friend through his art form. One thing they all express in common is the spirit of honouring memories. Watch the video below:

Play

The Memory Project by HDFC Life aims to curate more such stories that celebrate cherished memories and values that our loved ones have left behind, making a lasting impression on us. You can follow the campaign on Facebook as well as on Twitter.

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of HDFC Life Insurance and not by the Scroll editorial team.