Apology

An apology

Human Rights in Childbirth clarifies that no speaker paid for the privilege of speaking at the event.

An article published on this site entitled Ethical lines blur as organisations pay to speak at a conference on childbirth in Mumbai on February 7 mistakenly connected the difficulty of raising money for medical conferences independently of the pressures of sponsorship, with a non-medical conference at which sponsors/speakers had no control over the programme, content or direction of the event. The article focused on a conference in Mumbai organized by the international network Human Rights in Childbirth (HRiC) along with Birth India, a non-governmental organisation that promotes evidence-based benefits and best practices for childbirth in the country.

We have written about the significance of their work extensively before and we did not, in any way, want to single them out or to imply, that any sponsors had paid to speak at the event. HRiC has clarified that no speaker paid for the privilege of speaking at the event, registration fees were waived for all journalists, speakers, volunteers and TISS personnel, that waivers/reductions were handed out to several on the basis of hardship and access to the dinner was automatically included with registration. HRiC also confirmed that potential sponsors were strictly vetted, and many rejected for conflict of interest reasons, and that sponsors were never offered the opportunity to place speakers in the program. In the light of these facts the editorial team believes that we should withdraw the article. We apologise to HRiC.

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Snippets of wisdom on the health care industry by Dr. Kevin Lofton

His sessions stressed on the importance of patient centric healthcare.

At the Hospital Leadership Summit 2017, Dr Kevin Lofton, CEO Catholic Health Initiatives, spoke on the need to focus on patient experience, the role of the leader and shared some ideas from the practices of his own hospital chain. Here are some snippets from Dr Lofton’s presentation that will provide some food for thought. The Bringing Health to Life content hub contains his and many other insights and best practices for healthcare delivery.

The two kinds of willing patients

During the summit, a consensus emerged that the health care industry needs to learn customer centricity from other industries. However, the health care industry is unique in several ways and one of the fundamental differences is the nature of its customer. Dr Lofton spoke about how the customer i.e. the patient in the health care industry is different by way of motivation. He reminded the gathering that nobody willingly seeks out a doctor.

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The paradigm shift needed in health care

Dr Lofton emphasised that patient centricity needs to become a part of the very philosophy of a health care facility, a philosophy that drives every action and motivates every employee in the organisation. He described this revaluation of purpose as a paradigm shift. Dr Lofton spoke about how patient centricity starts much before the patient walks into the hospital, that the patient’s tryst with the health care system starts before a visit to the doctor is warranted. In this clip, Dr Lofton provides an example of one such paradigm shift for health care providers.

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At the 2017 Hospital Leadership Summit, Dr Lofton shared several such insights from his experience in the US health care system. He emphasised especially on the need of empathy alongside clinical skill among health care providers.

For more insights and best practices for healthcare delivery, visit Abbott’s Bringing Health to Life portal.

This article was produced on behalf of Abbott by the Scroll.in marketing team and not by the Scroll.in editorial staff.