Bollywood Music

The original ‘Meri Pyari Bindu’ from ‘Padosan’ is more than just a comical tune

The popular song by Kishore Kumar from the 1968 comedy mixes traditional Baul music with elements of the qawwali and the love ballad.

The May 12 release Meri Pyaari Bindu, starring Parineeti Chopra and Ayushmann Khurrana, borrows its title from one of Kishore’s Kumar’s most cherished songs. Kumar’s rendition of Meri Pyari Bindu in Padosan (1968) is spoofy in nature and mixes traditional Baul music with elements of the qawwali and the love ballad. RD Burman’s tune is comical but also has a fascinating back story.

In Padosan, simpleton Bhola (Sunil Dutt) falls for his perky neighbour Bindu (Saira Banu). She prefers the company of her music teacher Pillai (Mehmood). Bhola seeks the help of his friend and singer Vidyapati (Kishore Kumar) to win her affections.

Directed by Jyoti Swaroop, Padosan was adapted from Arun Chowdhury’s short story Pasher-Bari (Next-door Neighbour). It had been previously filmed in Bengali as Pasher Bari (1952), in Telugu as Pakkinti Ammayi (1953) and in Tamil as Adutha Veettu Penn (1960).

The actor and producer of Padosan, Mehmood, initially offered the role of Bhola to RD Burman. Burman had made a cameo appearance in Mehmood’s 1965 horror comedy Bhoot Bangla.

Bhoot Bangla (1965).

Burman’s comic timing had impressed Mehmood, but Burman preferred to compose songs instead. He came up with eight melodious numbers in Padosan and incorporated elements of romance, comedy and melancholy in the tunes. Burman balanced the mellow Kehna Hain with the boisterous Ek Chatur Naar and tested Lata Mangeshkar’s vocal range in her two solos, the chirpy Bhai Battur and the Khamaj raag-based Sharm Aati Hai.

In Mere Samne Wali Khidki Mein, a parody on lip-synching in films, Kishore Kumar conveys the humour visually through the actions of his character. Chatur Naar plays out like a vocal challenge between two singing heavyweights, pitting the autodidact Kishore Kumar against the classically trained Manna Dey.

The tune is set to traditional Baul music. Rajendra Krishnan’s lyrics begin with the nonsense words “Hing la lain, jhing la lain”, giving it an impromptu quality synonymous with Kumar’s style. Midway through his performance, Kumar calls out to Anuradha, and is interrupted by Banarasi (Mukri): who is Anuradha?

Anuradha was a character played by Kanan Devi in the 1937 biopic Vidyapati. It was based on the life of 14th-century poet Vidyapati, also the name of Kumar’s character in Padosan. By confusing Bindu with Anuradha, Kumar was drawing attention to actor-composer KC Dey, who featured in Vidyapati as Madhusudan, a saint looking for Anuradha, in the song Gokul Se Gaye Girdhari.

Kumar was referencing Dey’s vaishnav kirtan within the structure of a parody without caricaturing the singer. KC Dey taught music to RD Burman’s composer-father Sachin Dev Burman, and was Manna Dey’s uncle. Meri Pyaari Bindu isn’t just a fun song about unrequited love, but also a heartfelt tribute to a musical tradition that produced Manna Dey as well as Kishore Kumar.

Meri Pyaari Bindu from Padosan (1968).
We welcome your comments at
Sponsored Content BY 

When did we start parenting our parents?

As our parents grow older, our ‘adulting’ skills are tested like never before.

From answering every homework question to killing every monster under the bed, from soothing every wound with care to crushing anxiety by just the sound of their voice - parents understandably seemed like invincible, know-it-all superheroes all our childhood. It’s no wonder then that reality hits all of a sudden, the first time a parent falls and suffers a slip disc, or wears a thick pair of spectacles to read a restaurant menu - our parents are growing old, and older. It’s a slow process as our parents turn from superheroes to...human.

And just as slow to evolve are the dynamics of our relationship with them. Once upon a time, a peck on the cheek was a frequent ritual. As were handmade birthday cards every year from the artistically inclined, or declaring parents as ‘My Hero’ in school essays. Every parent-child duo could boast of an affectionate ritual - movie nights, cooking Sundays, reading favourite books together etc. The changed dynamic is indeed the most visible in the way we express our affection.

The affection is now expressed in more mature, more subtle ways - ways that mimics that of our own parents’ a lot. When did we start parenting our parents? Was it the first time we offered to foot the electricity bill, or drove them to the doctor, or dragged them along on a much-needed morning walk? Little did we know those innocent acts were but a start of a gradual role reversal.

In adulthood, children’s affection for their parents takes on a sense of responsibility. It includes everything from teaching them how to use smartphones effectively and contributing to family finances to tracking doctor’s appointments and ensuring medicine compliance. Worry and concern, though evidence of love, tend to largely replace old-fashioned patterns of affection between parents and children as the latter grow up.

It’s something that can be easily rectified, though. Start at the simplest - the old-fashioned peck on the cheek. When was the last time you gave your mom or dad a peck on the cheek like a spontaneous five-year-old - for no reason at all? Young parents can take their own children’s behaviour available as inspiration.

As young parents come to understand the responsibilities associated with caring for their parents, they also come to realise that they wouldn’t want their children to go through the same challenges. Creating a safe and secure environment for your family can help you strike a balance between the loving child in you and the caring, responsible adult that you are. A good life insurance plan can help families deal with unforeseen health crises by providing protection against financial loss. Having assurance of a measure of financial security for family can help ease financial tensions considerably, leaving you to focus on being a caring, affectionate child. Moreover,you can eliminate some of the worry for your children when they grow up – as the video below shows.


To learn more about life insurance plans available for your family, see here.

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of SBI Life and not by the Scroll editorial team.