Opening this week

‘Firangi’ film review: Why so serious, Kapil Sharma?

The entertainer’s forte is ignored, and he is miscast as the proverbial worm that turns.

Kapil Sharma’s second movie as a leading man after Kis Kisko Pyar Karoon (2015) is set in the 1920s, and mirrors the slow pace of life that probably prevailed during those years. At 160 minutes, Rajiev Dhingra’s movie is highly overstretched, and squanders its comic potential despite having a comedian as its hero.

Sharma is cast against type, and rarely appears comfortable in the role of the proverbial worm that turns. Sharma plays Mangatram, the slow-witted orderly of British officer Daniels (Edward Sonnenblick) who hopes to impress his lover Sargi (Ishita Dutta) with his position. Sargi is from the neighbouring village, which is the potential site of a liquor factory that will be set up by Daniels and the local king Inderveer (Kumud Mishra). The Britisher and the royal team up to use Mangatram to hoodwink the villagers into parting with their land. The orderly must set things right if he has to win over Sagri and her village folk.

With a tighter script, more laughs, and a stronger arc for Mangatram’s slow transformation from British lackey to pro-independence rebel, this cut-price Lagaan might even have worked. Dhingra lovingly creates Punjab of the ’20s, depicted as a happy place with inter-faith harmony and shared values, and casts a nice set of supporting actors, including Rajesh Sharma and Jameel Khan. But the filmmaker doesn’t pay as much attention to the unwieldy and uninvolving script. Sharma is barely convincing as a laggard who learns of the evil intentions of Daniels and Indraveer until it is nearly too late.

Like a dancer cast as a cripple or Amitabh Bachchan cast as a mute, Sharma flails in a role that does not capitalise on his strengths. Only a few scenes deploy his famed ability for the clever comeback and his quicksilver tongue, resulting in a performance that could have been delivered by any other actor.

Among the supporting cast, Kumud Mishra fares the best as the corrupt king who is not above forcing his daughter Shyamali (Monica Gill) to marry Daniels to line his account. American actor Edward Sonnenblick, who has mastered the art of playing the caricatured foreigner in Hindi films, brings his trademark hamming to his role. Sonnenblick is this generation’s Bob Cristo, without the innocent charm and the muscular frame, and he does not disappoint.

Firangi (2017).
We welcome your comments at
Sponsored Content BY 

When did we start parenting our parents?

As our parents grow older, our ‘adulting’ skills are tested like never before.

From answering every homework question to killing every monster under the bed, from soothing every wound with care to crushing anxiety by just the sound of their voice - parents understandably seemed like invincible, know-it-all superheroes all our childhood. It’s no wonder then that reality hits all of a sudden, the first time a parent falls and suffers a slip disc, or wears a thick pair of spectacles to read a restaurant menu - our parents are growing old, and older. It’s a slow process as our parents turn from superheroes to...human.

And just as slow to evolve are the dynamics of our relationship with them. Once upon a time, a peck on the cheek was a frequent ritual. As were handmade birthday cards every year from the artistically inclined, or declaring parents as ‘My Hero’ in school essays. Every parent-child duo could boast of an affectionate ritual - movie nights, cooking Sundays, reading favourite books together etc. The changed dynamic is indeed the most visible in the way we express our affection.

The affection is now expressed in more mature, more subtle ways - ways that mimics that of our own parents’ a lot. When did we start parenting our parents? Was it the first time we offered to foot the electricity bill, or drove them to the doctor, or dragged them along on a much-needed morning walk? Little did we know those innocent acts were but a start of a gradual role reversal.

In adulthood, children’s affection for their parents takes on a sense of responsibility. It includes everything from teaching them how to use smartphones effectively and contributing to family finances to tracking doctor’s appointments and ensuring medicine compliance. Worry and concern, though evidence of love, tend to largely replace old-fashioned patterns of affection between parents and children as the latter grow up.

It’s something that can be easily rectified, though. Start at the simplest - the old-fashioned peck on the cheek. When was the last time you gave your mom or dad a peck on the cheek like a spontaneous five-year-old - for no reason at all? Young parents can take their own children’s behaviour available as inspiration.

As young parents come to understand the responsibilities associated with caring for their parents, they also come to realise that they wouldn’t want their children to go through the same challenges. Creating a safe and secure environment for your family can help you strike a balance between the loving child in you and the caring, responsible adult that you are. A good life insurance plan can help families deal with unforeseen health crises by providing protection against financial loss. Having assurance of a measure of financial security for family can help ease financial tensions considerably, leaving you to focus on being a caring, affectionate child. Moreover,you can eliminate some of the worry for your children when they grow up – as the video below shows.


To learn more about life insurance plans available for your family, see here.

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of SBI Life and not by the Scroll editorial team.