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In photos: Dinosaurs run wild once again in ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’

The sequel to ‘Jurassic World’ will be released on June 7 in India.

Dinosaurs are back, and so are their protectors Owen Brady and Claire Dearing in Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. In the sequel to Jurassic World (2015), the leads have to grapple with duplicitous allies and an impending volcano eruption that threatens to destroy all the dinosaurs at the fictional Isla Nublar, the home of the now-defunct Jurassic World theme park.

JA Bayona takes over as director from Colin Trevorrow, who has co-written the sequel with Derek Connolly. The movie will be released in India in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu on June 7, two weeks before it hits the screens in the United States of America. It will compete at the Indian box office with the Rajnikanth-starrer Kaala.

The fantasy adventure is the second entry in the Jurassic World trilogy and the fifth in the Jurassic Park franchise that began with Steven Spielberg’s classic in 1993. Chris Pratt reprises his role as dinosaur trainer Owen, while Bryce Dallas Howard returns as Claire, former Jurassic World manager-turned-dinosaur rights activist. New additions to the cast include Isabella Sermon, Rafe Spall, Justice Smith and Geraldine Chaplin.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

Fallen Kingdom is set four years after the events of the 2015 film, which ended with the destruction of the Isla Nublar theme park after a hybrid predator escaped from captivity. The remaining cloned dinosaurs on the island are left to fend for themselves. When the island is threatened by a volcano eruption, Claire decides to evacuate the creatures to a facility in the United States of America. She teams up with with Benjamin Lockwood (James Cromwell), once the partner of John Hammond, who pioneered the theme park project in Jurassic Park (1993). Her boyfriend, Owen, jumps in to assist – he cannot resist the pull of the place where he once worked as a trainer, especially since his beloved raptor Blue is somewhere on the island.

“He’s coming to terms with his responsibility in working with the raptors and ultimately what the final intention with these things could be,” Owen said about his character in an interview to Slashfilm. “…what brings him there is not so much saving the dinosaurs, it’s protecting Claire; his love for her. He knows she’s too big-headed. He knows she’s going to go. He’s not going to let her go on her own, so it’s his love for her that brings him back to the island. At first. Through the course he realises there’s a little bit more to his relationship with Blue.”

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

Blue and Owen had developed a special bond in the 2015 film as he had trained the female Velociraptor since her birth. At the end of the first film, Blue was the last surviving raptor on the island and helped defeat the hybrid dinosaur.

Owen’s “hold-it-there” gesturing motion during his training of Blue and the other raptors, which inspired a hilarious tribute by zoo keepers, is also back in the new movie.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

While Jurassic World was a global blockbuster, it was panned for its portrayal of Claire Dearing, who played second fiddle to Owen and was always in high heels even while on the run from dinosaurs. In the early portions of the film, she was shown as career-driven and thereby unsympathetic and lacking maternal instincts. “Claire didn’t have to be a feminist icon, but we deserved more,” film critic Jada Yuan wrote about the film in Vulture. “She deserved more. In the end, her great takeaway seems to be that it’s time to stop being a frigid bitch and start popping out babies.”

Bayona assured that the sequel would flesh out Claire’s character. “Of course, there was a lot of criticism on the first movie, and we all were very aware of it,” Bayona told Den of Geek. “But, for me, it was (a) natural thing to give more to the character of Claire because all my movies, I always had a female character in the centre. So, for me it was the most natural thing to do, focus on Claire at the same level that Owen.”

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

Some of the familiar baddies have returned in Fallen Kingdom. After a brief role in Jurassic Park (1993), Dr Henry Wu (BD Wong) was back in the 2015 film as the geneticist who headed the dinosaur cloning project for the revived theme park. In the sequel, he has more evil designs up his sleeve.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

James Cromwell’s Benjamin Lockwood turns out to be a villain disguised as an ally. He cons Owen and Claire into bringing the dinosaurs to an American sanctuary for his own selfish motives.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

Other new antagonists include Eli Mills (Toby Jones), Lockwood’s aide and Gunnar Eversoll (Rafe Spall), an arms dealer who sells dinosaurs at auctions.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

As if human villains were not enough, a new hybrid dinosaur named Indoraptor also runs amok, causing mayhem.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

The film brings back familiar faces from the original franchise, including fan favourite chaos theorist Ian Malcolm, played by Jeff Goldblum. “These creatures were here before us and and if we are not careful, they are going to be here after,” Goldblum’s character warns in the trailer. Goldblum first made his appearance as Dr Ian Malcolm in the 1993 original.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

Steven Spielberg, who directed the first two films from the original franchise, is the executive producer for the new production.

In an interview, Bayona gave credit for the franchise’s success to Spielberg. “I think in these movies you have a voice, which is Steven Spielberg,” Bayona told Den of Geek. “I think he created the franchise, he supervised all the movies and he is, all the time, supervising the biggest decisions, the most important decisions. We’re always taking consideration of that.”

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Image credit: Universal Pictures.

The release date of the third and final installment has already been announced: June 11, 2021.

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Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018).
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The next Industrial Revolution is here – driven by the digitalization of manufacturing processes

Technologies such as Industry 4.0, IoT, robotics and Big Data analytics are transforming the manufacturing industry in a big way.

The manufacturing industry across the world is seeing major changes, driven by globalization and increasing consumer demand. As per a report by the World Economic Forum and Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Ltd on the future of manufacturing, the ability to innovate at a quicker pace will be the major differentiating factor in the success of companies and countries.

This is substantiated by a PWC research which shows that across industries, the most innovative companies in the manufacturing sector grew 38% (2013 - 2016), about 11% year on year, while the least innovative manufacturers posted only a 10% growth over the same period.

Along with innovation in products, the transformation of manufacturing processes will also be essential for companies to remain competitive and maintain their profitability. This is where digital technologies can act as a potential game changer.

The digitalization of the manufacturing industry involves the integration of digital technologies in manufacturing processes across the value chain. Also referred to as Industry 4.0, digitalization is poised to reshape all aspects of the manufacturing industry and is being hailed as the next Industrial Revolution. Integral to Industry 4.0 is the ‘smart factory’, where devices are inter-connected, and processes are streamlined, thus ensuring greater productivity across the value chain, from design and development, to engineering and manufacturing and finally to service and logistics.

Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, artificial intelligence and Big Data analytics are some of the key technologies powering Industry 4.0. According to a report, Industry 4.0 will prompt manufacturers globally to invest $267 billion in technologies like IoT by 2020. Investments in digitalization can lead to excellent returns. Companies that have implemented digitalization solutions have almost halved their manufacturing cycle time through more efficient use of their production lines. With a single line now able to produce more than double the number of product variants as three lines in the conventional model, end to end digitalization has led to an almost 20% jump in productivity.

Digitalization and the Indian manufacturing industry

The Make in India program aims to increase the contribution of the manufacturing industry to the country’s GDP from 16% to 25% by 2022. India’s manufacturing sector could also potentially touch $1 trillion by 2025. However, to achieve these goals and for the industry to reach its potential, it must overcome the several internal and external obstacles that impede its growth. These include competition from other Asian countries, infrastructural deficiencies and lack of skilled manpower.

There is a common sentiment across big manufacturers that India lacks the eco-system for making sophisticated components. According to FICCI’s report on the readiness of Indian manufacturing to adopt advanced manufacturing trends, only 10% of companies have adopted new technologies for manufacturing, while 80% plan to adopt the same by 2020. This indicates a significant gap between the potential and the reality of India’s manufacturing industry.

The ‘Make in India’ vision of positioning India as a global manufacturing hub requires the industry to adopt innovative technologies. Digitalization can give the Indian industry an impetus to deliver products and services that match global standards, thereby getting access to global markets.

The policy, thus far, has received a favourable response as global tech giants have either set up or are in the process of setting up hi-tech manufacturing plants in India. Siemens, for instance, is helping companies in India gain a competitive advantage by integrating industry-specific software applications that optimise performance across the entire value chain.

The Digital Enterprise is Siemens’ solution portfolio for the digitalization of industries. It comprises of powerful software and future-proof automation solutions for industries and companies of all sizes. For the discrete industries, the Digital Enterprise Suite offers software and hardware solutions to seamlessly integrate and digitalize their entire value chain – including suppliers – from product design to service, all based on one data model. The result of this is a perfect digital copy of the value chain: the digital twin. This enables companies to perform simulation, testing, and optimization in a completely virtual environment.

The process industries benefit from Integrated Engineering to Integrated Operations by utilizing a continuous data model of the entire lifecycle of a plant that helps to increase flexibility and efficiency. Both offerings can be easily customized to meet the individual requirements of each sector and company, like specific simulation software for machines or entire plants.

Siemens has identified projects across industries and plans to upgrade these industries by connecting hardware, software and data. This seamless integration of state-of-the-art digital technologies to provide sustainable growth that benefits everyone is what Siemens calls ‘Ingenuity for Life’.

Case studies for technology-led changes

An example of the implementation of digitalization solutions from Siemens can be seen in the case of pharma major Cipla Ltd’s Kurkumbh factory.

Cipla needed a robust and flexible distributed control system to dispense and manage solvents for the manufacture of its APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients used in many medicines). As part of the project, Siemens partnered with Cipla to install the DCS-SIMATIC PCS 7 control system and migrate from batch manufacturing to continuous manufacturing. By establishing the first ever flow Chemistry based API production system in India, Siemens has helped Cipla in significantly lowering floor space, time, wastage, energy and utility costs. This has also improved safety and product quality.

In yet another example, technology provided by Siemens helped a cement plant maximise its production capacity. Wonder Cement, a greenfield project set up by RK Marbles in Rajasthan, needed an automated system to improve productivity. Siemens’ solution called CEMAT used actual plant data to make precise predictions for quality parameters which were previously manually entered by operators. As a result, production efficiency was increased and operators were also freed up to work on other critical tasks. Additionally, emissions and energy consumption were lowered – a significant achievement for a typically energy intensive cement plant.

In the case of automobile major, Mahindra & Mahindra, Siemens’ involvement involved digitalizing the whole product development system. Siemens has partnered with the manufacturer to provide a holistic solution across the entire value chain, from design and planning to engineering and execution. This includes design and software solutions for Product Lifecycle Management, Siemens Technology for Powertrain (STP) and Integrated Automation. For Powertrain, the solutions include SINUMERIK, SINAMICS, SIMOTICS and SIMATIC controls and drives, besides CNC and PLC-controlled machines linked via the Profinet interface.

The above solutions helped the company puts its entire product lifecycle on a digital platform. This has led to multi-fold benefits – better time optimization, higher productivity, improved vehicle performance and quicker response to market requirements.

Siemens is using its global expertise to guide Indian industries through their digital transformation. With the right technologies in place, India can see a significant improvement in design and engineering, cutting product development time by as much as 30%. Besides, digital technologies driven by ‘Ingenuity for Life’ can help Indian manufacturers achieve energy efficiency and ensure variety and flexibility in their product offerings while maintaining quality.

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The above examples of successful implementation of digitalization are just some of the examples of ‘Ingenuity for Life’ in action. To learn more about Siemens’ push to digitalize India’s manufacturing sector, see here.

This article was produced on behalf of Siemens by the Scroll.in marketing team and not by the Scroll.in editorial staff.