Short Take

Should Pakistani singer Ghulam Ali bear the burden of Kasab's act of terror?

India's rising tide of intolerance has descended into goondaism of the worst kind

The Shiv Sena is back in the news. I guess it's been a while since they made it to the front pages. They've gone back to the politics that gave them their oxygen all those years ago: intimidating the state into submission by targeting a familiar enemy. They have ensured that a concert by Ghulam Ali concert scheduled for Friday has been banned in Mumbai because their leader Udhav Thackeray vetoed it. This despite the fact that Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis had reportedly promised full protection to the Pakistani singer. Are we to then understand that the chief minister and the state machinery are subordinate to Thackeray's diktats?

We are told that Ghulam Ali is not welcome in Mumbai because its citizens have not forgiven Pakistan for its role in 26/11. So Ghulam Ali is welcome to sing in Delhi, he sings in even the prime minister's constituency in Varanasi, but he can't sing in Mumbai because of the collective outrage over the terror attack and Pakistan-sponsored cross-border terrorism. Are we to believe that only Mumbaikars feel strongly enough to stop a singer from performing while the rest of the country embraces him?

And what of those who want to hear him sing, who may not subscribe to the view of the alleged majority, who may genuinely believe that music cuts across boundaries? Do they not have a voice or is the Shiv Sena now that the sole spokesperson for the city of Mumbai? You could argue that it has always been like this: after all, didn't the Sena once dig up a cricket pitch ahead of an India-Pakistan series? And didn't the Congress government at the time timidly acquiesce to this act of thuggish behaviour?

The silent majority

When it did so in 1991, the cricket-crazy fans of Mumbai stayed silent. As many of us do today, even as a legendary singer is denied the right to play his music. Is Ghulam Ali to bear the guilt of what Ajmal Kasab did, and is that the only way the so-called collective conscience of a nation seeking vengeance will be satiated? Since we can't strike at a Lashkar camp in Muridke, so much easier to stop a music concert. It's easy to be brave sitting in a shakha in Mumbai rather than being a soldier along the LoC: the ISI won't stop sponsoring terror because the Sena stopped a music concert.

The fact is that this rising intolerance has now descended into goondaism of the worst kind. One day, it leads to a man being lynched to death in Dadri, the next day a concert being cancelled in Mumbai: the mindset of using muscle power to impose a religious agenda under the guise of spurious nationalism is much the same. And we stay quiet because we are too scared to speak. Or we have too much to lose by challenging the ruling class. I hate silence and I love my music: so I shall listen to a Ghulam Ali song on my IPod before I sleep tonight. Surely the Shiv Sena won't come into my bedroom. Or will they?

Support our journalism by paying for Scroll+ here. We welcome your comments at
Sponsored Content BY 

When did we start parenting our parents?

As our parents grow older, our ‘adulting’ skills are tested like never before.

From answering every homework question to killing every monster under the bed, from soothing every wound with care to crushing anxiety by just the sound of their voice - parents understandably seemed like invincible, know-it-all superheroes all our childhood. It’s no wonder then that reality hits all of a sudden, the first time a parent falls and suffers a slip disc, or wears a thick pair of spectacles to read a restaurant menu - our parents are growing old, and older. It’s a slow process as our parents turn from superheroes to...human.

And just as slow to evolve are the dynamics of our relationship with them. Once upon a time, a peck on the cheek was a frequent ritual. As were handmade birthday cards every year from the artistically inclined, or declaring parents as ‘My Hero’ in school essays. Every parent-child duo could boast of an affectionate ritual - movie nights, cooking Sundays, reading favourite books together etc. The changed dynamic is indeed the most visible in the way we express our affection.

The affection is now expressed in more mature, more subtle ways - ways that mimics that of our own parents’ a lot. When did we start parenting our parents? Was it the first time we offered to foot the electricity bill, or drove them to the doctor, or dragged them along on a much-needed morning walk? Little did we know those innocent acts were but a start of a gradual role reversal.

In adulthood, children’s affection for their parents takes on a sense of responsibility. It includes everything from teaching them how to use smartphones effectively and contributing to family finances to tracking doctor’s appointments and ensuring medicine compliance. Worry and concern, though evidence of love, tend to largely replace old-fashioned patterns of affection between parents and children as the latter grow up.

It’s something that can be easily rectified, though. Start at the simplest - the old-fashioned peck on the cheek. When was the last time you gave your mom or dad a peck on the cheek like a spontaneous five-year-old - for no reason at all? Young parents can take their own children’s behaviour available as inspiration.

As young parents come to understand the responsibilities associated with caring for their parents, they also come to realise that they wouldn’t want their children to go through the same challenges. Creating a safe and secure environment for your family can help you strike a balance between the loving child in you and the caring, responsible adult that you are. A good life insurance plan can help families deal with unforeseen health crises by providing protection against financial loss. Having assurance of a measure of financial security for family can help ease financial tensions considerably, leaving you to focus on being a caring, affectionate child. Moreover,you can eliminate some of the worry for your children when they grow up – as the video below shows.


To learn more about life insurance plans available for your family, see here.

This article was produced by the Scroll marketing team on behalf of SBI Life and not by the Scroll editorial team.