CWG 2018

CWG Games, Day 10, as it happened: Batra, Chopra, Krishan, Mary add to India’s gold medal tally

Catch all the live scores and updates from Gold Coast, Australia.

GOLD on CWG debut: The magnificent Mary Kom won India its first medal – a gold – on Day 10 after a thrilling final against Northern Ireland’s Kristina O’Hara.

Fellow Indian boxer Gaurav Solanki also won the gold in his category, while Amit Panghal and Manish Kaushik got a silver each. Shooter Sanjeev Rajput also won the yellow medal in the 50m Rifle 3 Positions event.

Javelin thrower Neeraj Chopra won the gold in his first ever Commonwealth Games with a season-best throw of 86.47 m.

India’s wrestlers also continued to haul in the medals, with Vinesh Phogat and Sumit Malik winning gold, and Sakshi Malik getting a bronze.

A magnificent gold for Manika Batra in women’s singles table tennis

DAY TEN: Shooting, athletics, badminton, wrestling and boxing among the sports in which Indians will be in action on Saturday. Here are all the results.

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5.45 pm: And that brings India’s day to a close. What a day it was! 8 gold, 5 silver, 4 bronze added to the medal tally, records broken, hearts won. Manika Batra was the star, she has done what no other Indian had done before her. She broke the stranglehold of the Singaporeans on the women’s table tennis gold. All in all, a day to be proud.

5.30 pm: Badminton - Mixed Doubles Bronze Medal Match

Chan-Goh beat out Satwik-Ashwini but it was not easy at all. This pair has grown so much during the course of this tournament. A tough schedule but they soldiered through it.

5.15 pm: Men’s Doubles Gold Medal Match

Sharath and Sathiyan took it all the way to the fifth game before losing to Drinkhall and Pitchford in a tight match. They win silver!

4.56 pm: Men’s +91kg Final Bout

Satish gets the silver but once again, it seemed like he has been robbed of a gold. He probably had the first two rounds, the third was well contested. This, at least, had to be a split decision. Got to feel for Satish, he gave it his all.

Commentators: “If you had said it was unanimous to the Indian, I would have probably said ‘okay.’ He fought that well.”

4.56 pm: Men’s +91kg Final Bout

Round 3: Close round but Satish should get this. He should get this gold but let’s see how the judges go.

4.56 pm: Men’s +91kg Final Bout

Round 2: Good round for Satish. Lots of body blows again and he seemed to land more often. Once again, the Indian should get this. One more round to go.

4.47 pm: Men’s +91kg Final Bout

Round 1: Good stuff by Satish. Lots of body blows and a few good upper cuts too. Clarke had a tough fight last night. Tight round though. If anything, lean towards the Indian boxer.

4.47 pm: Time for the Super Heavies. India’s Satish Kumar has a tough fight on his hands against Frazer Clarke.

4.34 pm: Rajiv Ouseph wins the bronze. Momentum is such a massive factor in sport. Prannoy could have sealed the win in straight games (HSP had 2 match points in game 2, but couldn’t convert) but Rajiv put together a series of good rallies then and suddenly we had a fight on our hands.

4.22 pm: Rajiv Ouseph and HS Prannoy are in the middle of a gladiatorial battle to decide bronze. The Englishman saves multiple match points to take the 2nd game 25-23! A 28-minute game to boot! This is breathtaking stuff.

4:21 pm: That medal tally is looking so impressive!

4.14 pm: Vikas Krishan wins the gold! It was a tricky bout against a tricky opponent but he kept his head, stuck to his tactics and won India’s third boxing gold. As the the commentator said, ‘Here’s a guy who knows what he is doing in the ring.”

This is Krishan’s last year as an amateur boxer. He has said he plans to go professional at the end of this year.

4.09 pm: Harmeet Desai and Sanil Shetty win bronze in men’s table tennis, winning 3-0 in straight games. Third game was tight, but Sanil and Desai edged it 12-10.

4.06 pm: FULL-TIME: England win the bronze medal playoff.

In a tournament filled with feel-good news, the hockey teams ending up without any medal must be tough to digest for fans.

IND v ENG live detailed updates HERE

3.17 pm: Squash Mixed Doubles Final

It’s a silver for Dipika Pallikal and Saurav Ghoshal as they lose their mixed doubles final to Australia’s Donna Urquhart and Cameron Pilley in straight games.

3.14 pm: Here’s the history maker Manika Batra with her gold medal! Take a bow!

3.11 pm: Not that her gold medal needs any padding, but Manika Batra is the first ever singles medallist in table tennis for India at the Commonwealth Games!

3.03 pm: She’s done it! Manika Batra wins the table tennis women’s singles gold after beating Singapore’s Yu Mengyu in straight games! She was absolutely unstoppable after she fought back from 2-7 down to win the first game! Completely dominated after that!

2.57 pm: Table Tennis Women’s Singles Final

“Singapore table tennis will be having nightmares about Manika Batra for four years,” says the commentator, as Manika Batra takes a 3-0 lead! The way she has played at these Games, it won’t be a stretch saying that! Batra wins the third game 11-2! Brutal.

2.54 pm: Squash Mixed Doubles Final

Dipika Pallikal and Saurav Ghosal have lost the first game of their gold-medal match. Can they fight back in the second?

2.49 pm: Table Tennis Women’s Singles Final

Manika Batra is in cruise control in the final! She’s just taken the second game 11-6 and, thereby, a 2-0 lead in the match!

2.41 pm: Table Tennis Women’s Singles Final

Incredible stuff from Manika Batra as she fights back from 2-7 down in the first game to win it 11-7! Nine straight points!

2.36 pm: Also going on right now is the mixed doubles squash final between India’s Dipika Pallikal/Saurav Ghosal and Australia’s Donna Urquhart/Cameron Pilley.

2.32 pm: It’s time for the table tennis women’s singles final between Manika Batra and Mengyu Yu of Singapore! Both paddlers are playing their third match of the day after the mixed doubles and women’s singles semi-finals.

2.21 pm: Badminton Women’s Doubles

It’s a bronze for Ashwini and Sikki as they wrap up their match 21-19, 21-19. It was a tough match but the Indians prevailed, thankfully in two games for Ashwini who will take the court for a fourth time in about an hour for the mixed doubles bronze-medal playoff.

2.19 pm: It’s been a good Games for India’s wrestlers.

2.14 pm: Here’s Vinesh Phogat with her gold medal. (We have no idea why her name is listed as Vinesh Vinesh!)

1.59 pm: Badminton Women’s Doubles Bronze Medal Match

Ashwini and Sikki have won a tight first game 21-19 but the Australians are threatening to take over the advantage. The Indians have to be careful in the second game.

1.48 pm: We’ve got a packed schedule in the next hour, starting with the badminton women’s doubles bronze-medal match, where Ashwini Ponnappa and Sikki Reddy are playing Australia’s Setyana Mapasa and Gronya Somerville.

1.45 pm: Wrestling Men’s Freestyle 86 kg

India’s Somveer locks up the bronze in his category, taking the number of medals Indian wrestlers have won at these Games to 12! Somveer beat Canada’s Alexander Moore 7-3 in the bronze playoff.

1.25 pm: Sumit Malik has just received his gold medal – one of two won by Indian wrestlers today.

1.19 pm: Women’s Freestyle 50 kg Nordic

It’s another wrestling gold for India as Vinesh Phogat defeats Canada’s Jessica Macdonald in the gold-medal match of her category. Vinesh scored two brilliant four-point takedowns via double leg holds in the first period to put the match beyond the reach of the Canadian. Vinesh had raced to a 13-3 lead in the first period itself but Macdonald asked for a referral and was successful.

The score moved back to 10-3 but Vinesh retook a 10-point lead in the second period to win the match by technical superiority.

1.01 pm: Men’s 4x400m Relay Final

India fail to finish the race! Ayyaswamy Dharun gave India a fantastic start in the first leg. The baton was exchanged clean enough but Amoj Jacob pulled up in the middle of the second leg and had to be lifted off by his teammates in the end. A sad ending, that. Botswana take gold and, don’t you know, celebrate with push-ups.

12.58 pm: Sakshi Malik does not look very happy while receiving her bronze medal. Understandable, considering she would have expected to win a medal of a different colour after her bronze at the Rio Olympics. Next time, then!

12.55 pm: Wrestling Men’s Freestyle 125 kg Nordic

India’s Sumit wins the gold after his final group opponent, Nigeria’s Sinivie Boltic, gives him a walkover! Sumit was already on top of his Nordic group before the match.

12.49 pm: Wrestling Women’s Freestyle 62 kg Nordic

Sakshi Malik wins the bronze after a thrilling match 6-5 on points against Tayla Ford of New Zealand! Ford was trailing 6-2 with seconds to go in the second period before scoring one one-point takedown and a two-point takedown to make it 6-5, with less than 10 seconds to go. Sakshi was in a disadvantageous position but somehow managed to not allow Ford to completely pin her down, thereby denying the Kiwi another two points that would have won her the match.

12.38 pm: Table Tennis Men’s Singles SF

It’s not to be for Sharath Kamal as he loses in straight games to Nigeria’s Quadri Aruna in the semi-finals 12-10, 11-9, 11-9, 11-7. Sharath will play for bronze on Sunday.

12.28 pm: Table Tennis Men’s Singles SF

It’s not going too well for Sharath Kamal in the semi-finals, where he is trailing 0-3 to Nigeria’s Quadri Aruna. It’ll be quite the comeback if he manages to still reach the final from here.

12.20 pm: Women’s 4x400 m Relay Final

A disappointing seventh-placed finish for India but there were some really tough competitors in the field.

12.12 pm: The women’s 4x400 m relay has begun! Stay tuned...

12.07 pm: Neeraj Chopra has just received his gold medal! He’s just 20! What a moment!

11.56 am: Men’s Triple Jump Final

India’s Arpinder Singh was in the third and final podium position for most of the final after recording a best jump of 16.46 m, but is then relegated to fourth by Cameroon’s Marcel Mayack II who jumps 16.80 m in his sixth and final attempt! Heartbreaking for the Indian as he misses out on a medal.

11.50 am: Men’s 1,500m Final

India’s Jinson Johnson finishes fifth but sets a new national record – 3:37.86! He should be proud of that effort!

11.40 am: Badminton Mixed Doubles SF

Not to be for Ashwini and Satwik, as Ellis/Smith win the deciding game 21-16 to book a spot in the final against the Adcocks!

Ashwini and Satwik will play for bronze later today. This also means that Ashwini will have played four matches by the end of the day as she is also in the women’s doubles bronze-medal match with Sikki Reddy! Ridiculous scheduling, really!

11.30 am: Badminton Mixed Doubles SF

It’s 11-9 to Ellis and Smith in the deciding game! This is still anyone’s match! Some incredible badminton on display!

11.22 am: Badminton Mixed Doubles SF

Meanwhile, Marcus Ellis and Lauren Smith have levelled things up in the mixed doubles semi-final against Satwik and Ashwini. This is turning out to be another epic match!

11.20 am: Let’s all raise a toast to the brilliant Neeraj Chopra!

11.09 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

It’s all over! Neeraj Chopra wins the gold by a mile! Well, 3.88 m actually, but that’s still a fair length in this sport! He was just too good for the rest of the pack! India’s Vipin Kashana, unfortunately, does not make the podium, ending up fifth with a best throw of 77.87 m.

11.05 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

Neeraj’s fifth throw is over 80 m again – 83.48 to be exact. All his successful throws so far have been over 80 m. Amazing consistency!

10.58 am: Men’s Triple Jump Final

India’s Arpinder Singh is in joint third position after the first attempt of the triple jump final, with a jump of 16.35 m.

10.57 am: Badminton Mixed Doubles SF

Satwiksairaj Rankireddy and Ashwini Ponnappa edge out England’s Marcus Ellis and Lauren Smith in the first game of their semi-final 22-20! Thrilling match so far!

10.54 am: Neeraj Chopra is happy with his latest throw, and why wouldn’t he be? A season best and the gold all but confirmed!

10.52 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

Neeraj Chopra’s throws a season best 86.47 m in his fourth attempt! That’s just 0.01m, or 1 cm, shorter than his personal best of 86.48! Super stuff! The gold is all but confirmed now for Neeraj.

10.41 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

Neeraj Chopra’s third throw goes 84.78 m long, which is a tad shorter than his first but he’s still at the top so far! Anderson Peters’s 82.20 is the second best throw so far, which is over three meters off Chopra’s.

10.35 am: Can Neeraj Chopra break the 89 m barrier? Tejaswin Shankar definitely believes he can!

10.33 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

Vipin Kashana records 77.87 in his third attempt, which boosts him into the top five for now. Neeraj Chopra has a failed second attempt but he is still on top of the table thanks to his magnificent first throw of 85.50 m!

10.30 am: Badminton Men’s and Women’s Singles SF

It’s an all-Indian women’s singles final at the 2018 CWG as PV Sindhu beats defending champion Michelle Li in straight games to join Saina Nehwal in the summit clash!

However, Malaysian legend Lee Chong Wei averted an all-Indian men’s singles final by beating HS Prannoy in three games in their semi-final. Chong Wei will take on Srikanth for the gold on Sunday!

10.26 am: Meanwhile, here’s what Usain Bolt tweeted after Jamaica came third in the men’s 4x100m relay final.

10.24 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

Vipin Kashana’s second throw is better than his first but he’s still nowhere near the top three, who have all crossed the 80-metre mark.

10.17 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

Neeraj Chopra has started the final with a bang! He’s thrown the javelin 85.50 m in his first attempt and that’s put him on top of the table for now!

10.10 am: Badminton Women’s Singles SF

PV Sindhu has won the first game of her semi-final against defending champ Michelle Li 21-18. Been a very good match so far!

10.09 am: Men’s Javelin Throw Final

Vipin Kashana records a first attempt of 72.16. His personal best is 80.04 so he understandably doesn’t look very happy with himself after that effort.

10.07 am: Badminton Men’s Singles SF

HS Prannoy has taken the second game 21-9 and we are into a decider!! Whattey turnaround!

10.05 am: The Men’s Javelin Throw final is about to begin! Neeraj Chopra and Vipin Kasana are both in the fray. Stay tuned...

9.57 am: Badminton Men’s Singles SF

Lee Chong Wei has won the first game of his semi-final against HS Prannoy 21-16, but the Indian has taken a 11-4 lead into the interval of the second! Can he force a decider? He should be able to from this position.

We unfortunately cannot tell you how exactly both players are performing because the match is not being shown in India! Instead, the broadcaster is showing PV Sindhu vs Michelle Li, where the score is 10-10 in the first game.

9.49 am: Boxing Men’s 60kg Final

It’s a silver for Manish Kaushik after another gripping boxing final! There was no way to tell who among the two finalists – Kaushik and Australia’s Harry Garside – was the better boxer, and this fact was reflected in the judges’ verdict, who gave a 3:2 split decision in favour of the Australian. Tough luck, Manish, but that was a gold-winning performance from the Indian on any other day!

9.40 am: Badminton Women’s Singles SF

Saina Nehwal joins K Srikanth and Satwiksairaj Rankireddy-Chirag Shetty in the finals of CWG after a gruelling three-game win over Scotland’s Kirsty Gilmour! Nehwal wins 21-14, 18-21, 21-17 after one hour and 11 minutes. She awaits the winner of the second semi-final between PV Sindhu and Michelle Li.

9.30 am: Badminton Men’s Singles SF

Kidambi Srikanth is through to the final after beating Rajiv Ouseph in straight games! He awaits the winner of the second semi-final between compatriot HS Prannoy and the legendary Malaysian Lee Chong Wei.

9.24 am: Boxing Men’s 52kg Final

Gaurav Solanki wins India’s second boxing gold medal of the day! Solanki dominated the first two rounds of his bout against Brendan Irvine, before the Northern Irishman put up a much better fight in the final round. Solanki was eventually awarded the bout by a 4:1 split decision from the judges!

9.20 am: Badminton Women’s Singles SF

Meanwhile, Kirsty Gilmour has fought back to win the second game against Saina Nehwal 21-18! This is turning out to be a fantastic semi-final, which is now into a deciding game!

9.16 am: Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions Final

Sanjeev Rajput wins India’s second gold of the day after breaking the Games record in he 50m Rifle 3 Positions final! Chain Singh, who was in the top three during the kneeling and prone positions, dropped out in the standing section and finished fifth.

9.14 am: Squash Women’s Doubles Semifinal

Dipika Pallikal and Joshna Chinappa are through to the final of the squash women’s doubles after beating England’s Laura Massaro and Sarah-Jane Perry in straight games!

8.59 am: Boxing Men’s 46-49kg Final

Over in boxing, India’s Amit Panghal wins silver after losing a very close bout to England’s Galal Yafai. The five judges were split 3:1 in their decision, with one of them ruling it as a tie. Amit looked to have the advantage in the first round but Galal fought back well in the next one and just about edged the final round. Hard luck, Amit!

8.50 am: Badminton Women’s Singles SF

Saina Nehwal has one foot in the final after winning the first game against Kirsty Gilmour of Scotland 21-14. Nehwal had taken an early lead before Gilmour fought back to level things up. However, Nehwal broke free after the interval and there was no stopping her.

8.29 am: Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions Final

The kneeling section of the final is over, with India’s Sanjeev Rajput and Chain Singh in third and fourth positions respectively. Rajput trails the leader, Grzegorz Sych of Canada, by over four points going into the prone section.

8.25 am: Badminton Women’s Doubles SF

Some bad news or India from the badminton courts as Ashwini Ponnappa and Sikki Reddy go down in three games in their semi-final against Malaysia’s Mei Kuan Chow and Vivian Hoo. Ashwini and Sikki had won the first game 21-17 but then lost the second 15-21. What happened in the deciding game only they will know as the Indians disintegrated and lost 4-21!

Ashwini needs to recover quickly from this defeat since she is later today due to partner up with Satwiksairaj Rankireddy in the mixed doubles semis.

8.15 am: If you’re wondering how the medals table looks like after Mary Kom’s gold, here it is:

8.13 am: Over on the wrestling mat, India’s Sumit has won his third straight group match in his Freestyle 125 kg Nordic category and is in pole position for gold.

And Somveer, who was knocked out in the quarter-finals of the Freestyle 86 kg, has won his second Repechage round and will now fight for bronze.

8 am: Women’s Hockey

Not so good news for India from the hockey turf as the England women’s team thrashed Rani Rampal and Co 6-0 in the bronze-medal playoff. Wow! If you missed the match, you can catch up with it on our hockey live blog here.

7.58 am: Table Tennis Women’s Singles SF

Meanwhile, Manika Batra has just pulled off a thrilling win of her own against Singapore’s Tianwei Feng in the semi-finals! Batra won the match 12-10, 5-11, 11-8, 5-11, 5-11, 11-9, 13-11! Would you believe it?! You’ll have to! Manika is through to the gold-medal round!!

7.55 am: A great moment between the two boxers after the final! Mutual respect is so important in sports regardless of results and this is great to see!

7.53 am: This is how the judges scored the two boxers in the final. Mary Kom coming out on top in each of the three rounds.

7.50 am: Boxing Women’s 45-48kg Final

Is there anything she can’t do?! The magnificent Mary Kom has just won the GOLD in her boxing category on her Commonwealth Games debut! She won the final against Northern Ireland’s Kristina O’Hara by a unanimous decision from the five judges! It was a great bout between the two and O’Hara even looked confident of being awarded the bout, but the judges saw otherwise.

7.35 am: Wrestling Men’s Freestyle 125 kg Nordic

Sumit wins a gripping match against Canada’s Korey Jarvis but not before some controversy at the end. Jarvis was leading by a point with seconds to go before Sumit managed to score a take-down. Jarvis protested that he had been bitten by the Indian during that grapple but the judges rule against him and award the match to Sumit, who has now played two and won two in his group!

7.25 am: Wrestling Women’s Freestyle 50 kg Nordic

Some good news for India from wrestling as Vinesh Phogat wins her second group match comfortably, by technical superiority, against Australia’s Rupinder Kaur. Vinesh will take on Canada’s Jessica Macdonald for gold!

7.23 am: Wrestling Men’s Freestyle 86 kg QF

Another upset for India as Somveer loses his quarter-final against Pakistan’s Muhammad Inam without much of a fight. Inam wins the match by technical superiority after taking a 10-0 lead in the first period itself.

7.20 am: Wrestling Women’s Freestyle 62 kg Nordic

Sakshi Malik is having a shocker on the wrestling mat! She has lost her second straight group match and is now out of contention for gold or silver. She can get a bronze at best after losing to Nigeria’s Aminat Adeniyi 6-3 to slip to fourth in her group.

7.13 am: Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions Qualification

Sanjeev Rajput tops the qualification table and he has broken Gagan Narang’s Games record in doing so! Chain Singh completes a 1-2 for India in qualification. The final will take place at 8.15 am IST.

7.08 am: Badminton Men’s Doubles SF

Satwiksairaj Rankireddy and Chirag Shetty are the first Indian shuttlers to book a spot in the final at Gold Coast after beating Sri Lanka’s Sachin Dias and B Goonethilleka 21-18, 21-10 in the semis!

Regardless of the result of the final on Sunday, Satwik and Chirag will be the first Indian men’s doubles pair to win a medal at the Commonwealth Games!

7 am: Wrestling Women’s Freestyle 50 kg Nordic

Vinesh Phogat also plays out a thrilling opening group match against Miesinnei Genesis of Nigeria but comes out a 6-5 winner on points! Vinesh was leading 4-1 after the first period before the Nigerian scored a four-point takedown in the second half. Fortunately for Vinesh, she managed to score a two-point takedown in the second period and hold on to her one-point lead till the end.

6.50 am: Wrestling Women’s Freestyle 62 kg Nordic

What just happened here! Sakshi Malik was leading 8-2 with two minutes to go in her group match against Michelle Fazzari before the Canadian launches an incredible fightback to level it up 8-8 with 10 seconds to go. Fazzari isn’t done yet as she scores another two-point takedown in the dying seconds of the match! The Indians contest the decision but aren’t successful as Fazzari is awarded the match by points! Wow! Sakshi Malik doesn’t know what just hit her in those last couple of minutes!

6.40 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

What a match! Pitchford and Ho first seem to be cruising after taking a 10-7 lead and having three match points, before Batra and Sathiyan save all three of them to make it 10-10. It is then the English pair’s turn to save two match points as the score moves on to 13-13 in the decider. Pitchford and Ho then win two superb rallies to take the decider 15-13 and, thereby, the match. They are through to the gold-medal round.

Unfortunately for India, this means that none of their two pairs in the mixed doubles semis made it to the gold-medal round. Sharath Kamal/Mouma Das will take on Manika Batra/Sathiyan G in an all-Indian bronze-medal playoff on Sunday.

6.27 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

The fightback is on! Manika Batra and Sathiyan G win the fourth game 11-7 to take the match into a decider! What a turnaround! They were trailing 0-2 in the match! Can they win three games in a row?

6.17 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

Manika Batra and Sathiyan G fight back to win the third game 11-5 against the English pair to stay alive in the contest. They need to win the next game as well.

6.14 am: Wrestling Men’s Freestyle 86 kg

India’s Somveer is through to the quarter-finals of his category after pinning down his opponent from Kiribati in the first period itself. He is awarded a victory by fall.

6.12 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

Manika Batra and Sathiyan G are down by two games to love against England’s Pitchford and Ho. Can they fight back?

6.07 am: Wrestling Women’s Freestyle 62 kg Nordic

Sakshi Malik has no trouble in her first Nordic group match against Berthe Ngolle from Cameroon and wins the match by technical superiority after taking a 10-0 lead in the first period.

5.58 am: Women’s Hockey

The Indian women’s hockey team is gearing up to take on England for the bronze medal in the match starting in a couple of minutes. You can follow the match in our hockey live blog here.

5.50 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

Disappointment for India in the first mixed doubles semi as Sharath and Mouma lose the deciding game 7-11 to concede the match to Gao and Yu. The Singaporeans again took an early 3-0 lead before the Indian fought back to level it 3-3 after taking a time-out. However, Gao and Yu were in no mood to relent and upped their game from there to race to a 10-6 lead again. That was the match.

Sharath and Mouma will now play for bronze, but there is still hope for India winning a gold or silver in this event as Manika Batra and Sathiyan G will now play their semi-final against England’s Tin-Tin Ho and Liam Pitchford.

5.45 am: Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions Qualification

Sanjeev Rajput shoots three 100s and a 99 in the prone position to jump to the lead in qualification, while Chain Singh moves to second with two 100s. Dean Bale, the leader after the kneeling round, drops to fourth after a poor third series of prone, in which he shot only a 94. One more position (standing) to go in qualification.

5.40 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

We’re back level in this semi-final as Gao and Yu fight back to take the fourth game 11-7! They had a 3-0 lead at the start, which was quickly overturned by Sharath and Mouma. Then, from 6-6, the Singaporeans won four points in a row backed by some mistakes from the Indians to make it 10-6. There was no coming back from there for the Indians as they lost the game 7-11. We’re into a decider!

5.30 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

Sharath and Mouma are now just a one-game win away from the gold-medal match as they take a 2-1 lead against Gao and Yu! Sharath executes a masterly backhand flick to seal a 11-9 win in the third game.

5.20 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

Sharath and Mouma hit back to take the second game 11-9! They were trailing the Singaporeans for most of the game but managed to sneak ahead after levelling the score to 9-9.

5.12 am: Sharath and Mouma got off to a poor start and were trailing 2-8 before they launched a fightback. But it was too late to actually affect the result of the first game.

5.10 am: Table Tennis Mixed Doubles SF

Sharath Kamal and Mouma Das lose the first game of their semi-final 8-11 to Singapore’s Gao and Yu.

5.05 am: Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions Qualification

Sanjeev Rajput and Chain Singh are in second and third spots in the qualification table after the kneeling position. Only England’s Dean Bale has shot better than the two Indians.

4.50 am: The table tennis action will be starting in about 10 minutes, where Sharath Kamal and Mouma Das will fight for a spot in the gold-medal round of the mixed doubles.

4.40 am: First up, we have the Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions Qualification and the second day of the Men’s Trap Qualification.

4 am: Good morning, everyone, and welcome to The Field’s live blog for Day 10 of the 2018 Commonwealth Games at Gold Coast, Australia.

We’re down to the final two days of action at the Games, where India will have a chance to increase their tally of 42 medals.

Saturday is also the final day of what has been a really successful shooting campaign for India, with as many as 15 medals won in the sport.

In wrestling, Rio Olympics bronze medallist Sakshi Malik will be on the mat for the first time at Gold Coast, along with Vinesh Phogat, in a bid to add to the eight medals won by Indian wrestlers so far.

Mary Kom will aim to win a gold in her first CWG campaign, while five Indian male boxers will hope to win their respective final bouts as well.

PV Sindhu, Saina Nehwal and the other badminton stars will play their semi-final matches on Saturday and hope to reach the gold-medal round on Sunday. The highlight of the day will be HS Prannoy’s match against the legendary Lee Chong Wei.

Neeraj Chopra will also look to win a gold in the javelin throw final, while Sharath Kamal and Sathiyan Gnanasekaran have a shot at men’s doubles gold as well.

Here is the entire Day 10 schedule for India.

If you missed the action on Day 9, here is a recap.

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Swara Bhasker: Sharp objects has to be on the radar of every woman who is tired of being “nice”

The actress weighs in on what she loves about the show.

This article has been written by award-winning actor Swara Bhasker.

All women growing up in India, South Asia, or anywhere in the world frankly; will remember in some form or the other that gentle girlhood admonishing, “Nice girls don’t do that.” I kept recalling that gently reasoned reproach as I watched Sharp Objects (you can catch it on Hotstar Premium). Adapted from the author of Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn’s debut novel Sharp Objects has been directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, who has my heart since he gave us Big Little Lies. It stars the multiple-Oscar nominee Amy Adams, who delivers a searing performance as Camille Preaker; and Patricia Clarkson, who is magnetic as the dominating and dark Adora Crellin. As an actress myself, it felt great to watch a show driven by its female performers.

The series is woven around a troubled, alcohol-dependent, self-harming, female journalist Camille (single and in her thirties incidentally) who returns to the small town of her birth and childhood, Wind Gap, Missouri, to report on two similarly gruesome murders of teenage girls. While the series is a murder mystery, it equally delves into the psychology, not just of the principal characters, but also of the town, and thus a culture as a whole.

There is a lot that impresses in Sharp Objects — the manner in which the storytelling gently unwraps a plot that is dark, disturbing and shocking, the stellar and crafty control that Jean-Marc Vallée exercises on his narrative, the cinematography that is fluid and still manages to suggest that something sinister lurks within Wind Gap, the editing which keeps this narrative languid yet sharp and consistently evokes a haunting sensation.

Sharp Objects is also liberating (apart from its positive performance on Bechdel parameters) as content — for female actors and for audiences in giving us female centric and female driven shows that do not bear the burden of providing either role-models or even uplifting messages. 

Instead, it presents a world where women are dangerous and dysfunctional but very real — a world where women are neither pure victims, nor pure aggressors. A world where they occupy the grey areas, complex and contradictory as agents in a power play, in which they control some reigns too.

But to me personally, and perhaps to many young women viewers across the world, what makes Sharp Objects particularly impactful, perhaps almost poignant, is the manner in which it unravels the whole idea, the culture, the entire psychology of that childhood admonishment “Nice girls don’t do that.” Sharp Objects explores the sinister and dark possibilities of what the corollary of that thinking could be.

“Nice girls don’t do that.”

“Who does?”

“Bad girls.”

“So I’m a bad girl.”

“You shouldn’t be a bad girl.”

“Why not?”

“Bad girls get in trouble.”

“What trouble? What happens to bad girls?”

“Bad things.”

“What bad things?”

“Very bad things.”

“How bad?”

“Terrible!!!”

“Like what?”

“Like….”

A point the show makes early on is that both the victims of the introductory brutal murders were not your typically nice girly-girls. Camille, the traumatised protagonist carrying a burden from her past was herself not a nice girl. Amma, her deceptive half-sister manipulates the nice girl act to defy her controlling mother. But perhaps the most incisive critique on the whole ‘Be a nice girl’ culture, in fact the whole ‘nice’ culture — nice folks, nice manners, nice homes, nice towns — comes in the form of Adora’s character and the manner in which beneath the whole veneer of nice, a whole town is complicit in damning secrets and not-so-nice acts. At one point early on in the show, Adora tells her firstborn Camille, with whom she has a strained relationship (to put it mildly), “I just want things to be nice with us but maybe I don’t know how..” Interestingly it is this very notion of ‘nice’ that becomes the most oppressive and deceptive experience of young Camille, and later Amma’s growing years.

This ‘Culture of Nice’ is in fact the pervasive ‘Culture of Silence’ that women all over the world, particularly in India, are all too familiar with. 

It takes different forms, but always towards the same goal — to silence the not-so-nice details of what the experiences; sometimes intimate experiences of women might be. This Culture of Silence is propagated from the child’s earliest experience of being parented by society in general. Amongst the values that girls receive in our early years — apart from those of being obedient, dutiful, respectful, homely — we also receive the twin headed Chimera in the form of shame and guilt.

“Have some shame!”

“Oh for shame!”

“Shameless!”

“Shameful!”

“Ashamed.”

“Do not bring shame upon…”

Different phrases in different languages, but always with the same implication. Shameful things happen to girls who are not nice and that brings ‘shame’ on the family or everyone associated with the girl. And nice folks do not talk about these things. Nice folks go on as if nothing has happened.

It is this culture of silence that women across the world today, are calling out in many different ways. Whether it is the #MeToo movement or a show like Sharp Objects; or on a lighter and happier note, even a film like Veere Di Wedding punctures this culture of silence, quite simply by refusing to be silenced and saying the not-nice things, or depicting the so called ‘unspeakable’ things that could happen to girls. By talking about the unspeakable, you rob it of the power to shame you; you disallow the ‘Culture of Nice’ to erase your experience. You stand up for yourself and you build your own identity.

And this to me is the most liberating aspect of being an actor, and even just a girl at a time when shows like Sharp Objects and Big Little Lies (another great show on Hotstar Premium), and films like Veere Di Wedding and Anaarkali Of Aarah are being made.

The next time I hear someone say, “Nice girls don’t do that!”, I know what I’m going to say — I don’t give a shit about nice. I’m just a girl! And that’s okay!

Swara is a an award winning actor of the Hindi film industry. Her last few films, including Veere Di Wedding, Anaarkali of Aaraah and Nil Battey Sannata have earned her both critical and commercial success. Swara is an occasional writer of articles and opinion pieces. The occasions are frequent :).

Watch the trailer of Sharp Objects here:

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This article was published by the Scroll marketing team with Swara Bhasker on behalf of Hotstar Premium and not by the Scroll editorial team.