indian cricket

Pay rise for Kohli, Mithali and Co: BCCI announces new contract structure for Indian cricketers

A new category A+ has been added for the men, that includes Kohli, Sharma, Dhawan, Bhuvneshwar and Bumrah.

Following negotiations for a pay-hike in the recent past between the cricketers and the board, the Board of Control for Cricket in India on Wednesday announced the addition of a new category (A+) for the centrally contracted players which includes the top players from the men’s team.

Virat Kohli, Rohit Sharma, Jasprit Bumrah, Bhuvneshwar Kumar and Shikhar Dhawan – the five players who play consistently across three formats – are the first set of players to feature in this category and will earn Rs 7 crore in the contract period.

The senior women’s cricketers will also get a pay rise along with the addition of a new category (Category C) – the top bracket of players here will get Rs 50 lakh during the contract period. Among the women, World Cup stars Mithali Raj, Jhulan Goswami, Harmanpreet Kaur and Smriti Mandhana have been kept in the top bracket.

The Annual Player Contracts were announced for the period from October 2017 to September 2018. In a press release, the board stated that the Committee of Administrators “was of the view that the performance and position of Indian Cricket needs to be recognised with the fee structure comparable to the best in the world.”

Here’s a look at the top categories.

Former India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni and senior off-spinner R Ashwin found themselves relegated from the top-paid bracket.

Dhoni and Ashwin have been bracketed in the A category along with Ravindra Jadeja, Murali Vijay, Cheteshwar Pujara, Ajinkya Rahane and Wridhhiman Saha. These seven players would be eligible for a contract of Rs five crore each.

Asked about Dhoni being kept out of top bracket, a senior BCCI official told PTI: “It’s a simple logic that selectors have applied. Play more and get paid more. The five in question are indispensable in all three formats right now. They deserved to be paid more. Also Ravi Shastri, Kohli and Dhoni have been taken into confidence.”

Explaining the logic behind picking category A players, the official said,”The second group comprises players who are certainties in at least one format like Saha and Pujara. They are in second group because of their dependability in at least one format,” he said.

“Dhoni has retired and Ashwin, Jadeja are no longer automatic selections in limited overs. They are as of now not in WC scheme. So in second category,” the official added.

The B category will feature KL Rahul, Umesh Yadav, Kuldeep Yadav, Yuzvendra Chahal, Hardik Pandya, Ishant Sharma and Dinesh Karthik. In Grade C will be Kedar Jadhav, Manish Pandey, Axar Patel, Karun Nair, Suresh Raina, Parthiv Patel and Jayant Yadav.

The Grade B category contracts are worth Rs 3 crore, while those in Grade C are of Rs 1 crore.

“The third group (B) comprises of players who are considered as floaters and can be put in anywhere and players who have played at least one match for India in the last one year have been put in Grade C,” the official said.

From the previous Rs 2 crore (top category), the CoA-led BCCI increased it by 350 percent to make it Rs 7 crore. The second category has seen 500 percent rise at Rs 5 crore.

There was some good news for domestic cricketers as first XI players will now get Rs 35,000 per day in a four-day game making their match fees rocket from Rs 40,000 to Rs 1.40 lakh per match. Add to it the TV rights money will make their per match fee go up to Rs 3 lakh per match.

“The Committee of Administrators (CoA) was of the view that the performance and position of Indian Cricket needs to be recognised with the fee structure comparable to the best in the world,” the BCCI said in a statement.
“The CoA recognises that the actual income of the BCCI fluctuates on an annual basis depending on the number of home matches Team India (Senior Men) plays. Hence, to insulate the player compensation, the CoA has sanctioned the creation of a ‘Players Revenue/Compensation Equalisation Fund’ (PR/CEF) to which the BCCI will contribute approximately Rs 125 crore per annum from its surplus,” the statement read.

One of the other talking points from the announcement is the fact that pace spearhead Mohammad Shami has been left out of the central contract list after allegations of domestic abuse surfaced against him earlier in the day.

While Shami’s name has been withheld on allegations of domestic violence and adultery by his wife, veteran Yuvraj Singh and young Rishabh Pant have been omitted from the last list even as Suresh Raina makes a comeback.

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